The Boatman

Robi’s boat gently swayed in the cool evening breeze of the mighty Ganges at the mouth of the estuary as he prepared his supper in it for the night, a little bit of rice, a bowl of dal and two fried Tilapias. His life as a boatman in this part of the river, especially after dark was pretty lonely and it seemed he preferred it that way, a single man on a sixteen-foot wooden boat in a water world of solitary existence.

With no family or home on land, the boatman fancied spending his entire time on the waves itself. Staying on the river had become such an obsession, that it had been twenty years since he had stepped much beyond the banks and ventured on land to someplace else. Over the years he had lost the desire to do anything else. He had accepted life on the river but constantly questioned the purpose of his mortal presence.

To earn a living the boatman would occasionally ferry, men, their animals, and goods across the river, however, preferring to stay away from people as far as possible. Living a self-sustained life without the need for much money or material wealth, he seldom pondered on the reason for his earthly residence.

Robi relied on the forest and the river for his supplies. He avoided buying things as far as possible. Occasionally he would cast anchor and venture into the jungle on foot to cut wood or acquire honey, or get other supplies, always keeping an eye on his beloved watercraft, never too far from the tides and the swells.

At times when he needed to acquire certain unavoidable human manufactured supplies, he would buy them from traders and passengers who used his ferrying services. Though he hated it, rarely he would also need to buy a thing or two from a shop on some busy port close to the river’s edges.

Boats and water vessels were not uncommon in the region of the Sundarban delta formed by the confluence of the three legendary rivers, the revered Meghna, the mysterious Brahmaputra, and the mighty Ganges.

Here, there were several busy ports and river crossing where a boatman could earn a handsome living, Robi, however, preferred to conduct his business in the lesser-known interior regions of this mysterious aquatic-jungle domain. After all, it was not money that he was searching for, it was the reason for his being.

The life of a boatman was not a means to earn for him, he did not care much about money or wealth. Riding the boat on the river, living on the delta was all that he knew and did. Like a fish was meant to eat worms from a riverbed, like a crow was destined to pluck on rotten flesh, sailing through the delta was Robi’s existence.

He only wondered, was there a purpose to this existence. He questioned himself, that what good had he done to make the world a better place. Not many or hardly any boatman knew the maze of waterways as well as Robi in this ancient wet and wild hydro realm, but what good was his knowledge. He felt he had wasted his days, and this pushed him further to live a life of secluded existence.

Spanning from the river Hooghly in India’s West Bengal state to the Baleswar river in the neighbouring country of Bangladesh, pouring into the Bay of Bengal the Sundarban delta mainly comprised of more than ten thousand square kilometres of closed and open mangrove forests, agricultural tracts, mudflats, shape-shifting sandy islands, and barren lands intersected by innumerous tidal streams and channels.

In other words, it was a geological maze of ever-changing sea, river, land and forest. A region whose history could be traced back to around 200 AD to the days of Chand Sadagar, a rich and powerful river and sea merchant of the Bengal and Assam regions. After which, for more than a thousand two hundred years the area mostly remained wild, inaccessible, and uninhabited.

Then during the Mughal period, many criminals took refuge in these forests to escape Emperor Akbar’s advancing army when he annexed Bengal in 1576. As time passed people evading the law, or seeking a solitary existence found their way into these forests.

Over the seventeenth century, many of the hidden jungle dwellings built by the initial settler-felons fell in the hands of Portuguese pirates, salt smugglers, and dacoits. Robi came from this Mixed lineage of hardened and adaptable seafaring, land-exploring, sailor-fighter, river-jungle people.

Later in 1757, the area was obtained from the Mughal Emperor Alamgir II by the British East India Company, with the aim to extract any treasures that might be available. Having no expertise or adaptation experience in mangrove forests the Brits had to rely on locals for exploring the region, and Robi’s ancestors were the boatmen who made these British explorations possible. In 1769 they were the ones to help the British map the region.

It was not until nearly a century later in 1860 when for the first time the British took efforts to systematically manage Sundarban’s tracts of forest. Once again Robi’s forefathers were engaged to make these expeditions possible.

Finally, much later in 1997, four protected areas in Sundarbans were declared as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and Robi the boatman, a seed spawned from nearly two millennia of generational experience of local maritime and survival knowledge continued sailing on these waterways.

The region was home to 453 species of faunal wildlife, including 290 birds, 120 fishes, 42 mammals, 35 reptiles, and 8 amphibians, and while the fabled Royal Bengal Tiger was the king of this aquatic forest, Robi was undoubtedly the lord of the known rivers and the hidden water channels.

The maritime boundary between the two countries of India and Bangladesh was a bit hard to distinguish in this hydro-maze of mysterious floating forests and aquatic haze and Boatmen from one country would often drift into the waters of the other nation. It was not uncommon to happen. Robi was however never lost and exactly knew where he was at any given time or place in this labyrinth of waterways.

India’s Border Security Force or BSF and Bangladesh’s Border Guard Bangladesh or BGB had a daunting task at their hands to guard this sensitive border, where people of similar ethnicity and culture resided on opposite sides of imaginary fences. Men of both the nation’s bordering forces here knew Robi as the harmless boatman and overlooked his occasional maritime trespasses. At times they even took his help to navigate certain unknown parts of the region.

Though the land border between the two countries, the fifth-longest in the world, saw more action in terms of being an active human trafficking and smuggling route for food items, medicines, and drugs from India to Bangladesh, the deeper regions of the maritime border, being more difficult to access had lesser human interference.

That did not mean the place was void of human beings though. More than five million people inhabited 54 of the 102 islands on the Indian side alone. Still, the majority of the region, the unapproachable tracts, the wild interiors were mostly void of human presence.

Lineages of those initial settlers – men from Chand Sadagar’s days, criminals evading the Moghul armies, Portuguese pirates, salt smugglers, dacoits, and others who came from different backgrounds and places had settled in the few habitable zones.

Now poor and impoverished fisherfolks, farmers, honey-collectors, and prawn seed gatherers in waist-deep waters, facing threats from crocodiles, sharks and the Royal Bengal Tiger had come to call the few livable regions in this damp and hostile ecosphere their home.

The southernmost populated sandy islands shifted their shapes nearly every day as a result of the changing course of river channels and powerful eroding tidal waves shifting land from one place and creating sandbanks somewhere else. Robi was pretty comfortable meandering his trusted boat through these fluctuating aqua-terra-scapes.

The deeper marshy jungles having stabler terrain was extremely hostile and inaccessible even to the BSF and BGB forces, and Robi was perhaps the only person alive to know some of these most interior segments and how to reach them. Knowledge of the ever-changing marshy terrain and tidal timings causing the rise and fall of the water level were critical to accessing these unreachable regions.

As the sixteen-footer gracefully rose and fell on the gentle river swell, as the cool evening breeze pushed inland from the salty bay, the boatman raised his head after slurping the last morsel of Tilapia from his plate, to smell the sublime scents of the sea, the river and the forest and to hear the nightly sounds that were music to his lonely ears at the end of the day.

Then suddenly he heard some noises, which were not expected. At first, he thought it was a mistake, but then he heard it again and then again. He was certain it was human voices wading through the water close to the bank but what were people doing in this uninhabited portion of the river. Human presence at that time in that place was just not possible.

Washing his hands and pushing his empty food plate aside Robi lifted his lantern and moved to the bow of the boat to have a better look at the side of the bank, from where he heard the noises. There in the faint light of the simmering kerosene lantern, the boatman saw a group of around twenty men, women and children in torn and tattered clothes with bodies covered in cuts and bruises and with the fear of death written all over their faces.

They were terrified to have been spotted by Robi. They panicked and got directionally disoriented. They tried to climb the muddy banks but mostly slipped back into the water along with their few belongings and baggage.

For a moment Robi did not know how to react, then realising the helplessness and fright of the people he spoke up to comfort them. “Hey! Do not be afraid, who are you people? Do not panic, stay still, let me help,” said the boatman in a reassuring voice, which eventually calmed the water-wading men, women and their children, who seemed to be understanding his actions better than the words that he said.

At that moment the boatman saw the bright halogen beam of a BSF patrol boat skim across the glassy surface of the river and scan the forest beyond the shore. The beam somehow missed the group of people huddled by the water’s edge, with their heads just above the surface.

“Please do not reveal us.” pleaded an elder from among the submerged group in a weird Bengali dialect, which Robi had never heard before. Realising that these were simple people in some kind of trouble, Robi decided to help. Reacting fast he rowed his vessel a few feet, just in time to hide the submerged people from view of the patrol boat of the BSF men.

“Hello sir, is everything okay, it is me Robi the boatman just finishing my supper before I hit the bed. Can I help you sirs in any way,” said Robi in a most cordial and friendly manner? After few minutes of interaction, the BSF patrol boat left Robi and went on its way.

The boatman then picked up the group into his boat one by one, till all of them were out of the water and safe. He told them to stay crouched and quiet till he rowed to a safer distance. After an hour of rowing, Robi saw that most of the group was fast asleep. It seemed like they had not rested in many days. Then at a very secluded spot in the river, where he felt they were safe, Robi released the anchor of his boat to take a little rest.

As the night progressed Robi broke a conversation with the elder who had spoken to him previously in the unknown and broken Bengali dialect. He came to know their story from the elder. He realised that they simply wanted to start a new and secluded life and forget something terrifying that they had experienced.

Over the course of the next few days, Robi took care of the group in his boat and sailed deeper and deeper into the delta, to a place only known to him and no one else. His intricate knowledge of the waterways helped to steer clear of the BSF and BGB patrol boats during this journey to the hidden place.

Somewhere deep in the labyrinth of the delta when he finally came to point in the waterway, which was blocked by a peculiar variety of thick mangrove trees, a gentle smile broke across Robi’s face. The group thought why had he brought them there to a dead end, to a seemingly impregnable marshy forest.

“Patience my friends,” said Robi and rammed his boat in between the mangrove trees at the river’s end. The people in the boat screamed realising that the boat would crash, and they would be stranded in this godforsaken place.

Just like the tip of a spear moves through muscle, the bow of the boat smoothly pushed the massive mangrove trees aside. The boat progressed moving more trees out of the way to create a passable waterway. As the boat moved ahead the trees in the back came back to their original places closing the channel. None of them had ever seen anything like this in their lives. They were floating mangrove trees appearing to be immobile but easily movable by simply pushing them aside.

At the end of the secret waterway, Robi welcomed the group to a beautiful portion of the forest. Here there were fish in the streams, game to hunt, fruits on the trees, and land to cultivate. Most importantly no one could ever find them there, the place was totally hidden and secluded.

Going back to that dreadful night when Robi had saved the group, the elder had shared their sad story with him. A horrifying tale of how they had escaped genocide and had paddled on rickety boats and walked on foot from a far-off region. That they were the only remaining people from their village, everyone else was slaughtered. Men were shot and hacked, women were raped and mutilated, children and babies were thrown into flames. How all they wanted to do was to start a new and secluded life and forget their pains.

In 2015 more than 50,000 belonging to the same ethnicity of this group were displaced from their country. Using rickety boats, they escaped to various Southeast Asian countries via the waters of the Strait of Malacca, Bay of Bengal, and the Andaman Sea. Around twenty of them found a paradise home deep in the jungles of the Sundarban delta region and a boatman found the purpose of his existence.

The Boatman


Copyright © 2021 TRISHIKH DASGUPTA

This work of fiction, written by Trishikh Dasgupta is the author’s sole intellectual property. All rights are reserved. No part of this story may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including printing, photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, send an email to the author at trishikh@gmail.com or get in touch with Trishikh on the CONTACT page of this website.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Trishikh

Trishikh Dasgupta

Adventurer, philosopher, writer, painter, photographer, craftsman, innovator, or just a momentary speck in the universe flickering to leave behind a footprint on the sands of time..READ MORE

129 Comments Add yours

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Ned for reblogging this story of mine. Always appreciate your constant support.

      Liked by 3 people

  1. KUSHANK says:

    I would repeat myself in saying that, I really love the simplicity with which you write your stories. Must confess that I skimmed the history part of delta, but rest was too good.

    Liked by 10 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Kushank, it really touches my heart when someone appreciates my stories. I always treasure your appreciation. Yes, I sometimes do get carried away with history. It’s a constant inner battle for me to decide how much of history to put in my stories. So glad to have your candid feedback. It will help me become a better storyteller.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Rolfe DH says:

    I enjoyed reading your story from end to end – a fascinating blend of story, history, ethnography, and imagination from end to end. I wondered, however, if your protagonist could realistically be as ascetic as you portray him. The bird and the fish are as avid about finding their worm as any person is about finding their next meal and source of shelter. Though the protagonist does not reply on modern commercial centers, he still thrives on every aspect of his environment, especially his relations and interactions with the many people who are part of it. To a city-dweller, his life may appear quiet and empty of people. How does he perceive the lives of the city-dwellers?

    Liked by 11 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      These are some really pertinent questions that you have raised Rolfe. Some of which even I have not thought of. You have given me much to think. Really Appreciate you comment. So glad that you liked my story.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. A fascinating description of shifting sands and waters and we wonder how there will be a story to tell about Robi in his simple lonely life, then suddenly we are plunged into action. I hope there are others like Robi, saving people who are unknown to the rest of the world.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Trishikh says:

        Your analysis of the story is so great. I just wrote it in a flow, few hours everyday early morning for a week (that’s how I usually write), but now you make me realise that it started simple and transcended into action. Yes, the world does need people like Robi.

        Like

  3. Rolfe DH says:

    Also – your choice of an image/illustration is perfect.

    Liked by 7 people

  4. orededrum says:

    Great & impressive story ! I dream about travelling in this part of world. I only know it partially from some books by Mircea Eliade.

    Liked by 10 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Indeed we need to be so thankful for books, which allow us to travel and experience so much. You should visit the Sundarbans, it is indeed a fascinating place. Lot of tourist come here every year.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. orededrum says:

        Thank you ! I hope so !

        Liked by 5 people

  5. Fantastic. Well worth the effort going by the great feedback you always get.

    Liked by 11 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. So many have been so kind to my stories. They have liked them constantly. It gives me great encouragement to continue my writing.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Loved this story Trishikh. ❤️❤️ You should try publishing a book very soon. A thoughtful message delivered!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are too kind with your appreciation. I will explore publishing after I finish writing 50 stories.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s great Trishikh. 👏👏👏

        Liked by 3 people

  7. KK says:

    A boatman finding his ikigai is an interesting story with turn of events. I liked the way the story has been told, making it informative too. Would like to read other stories in days to come. Thanks.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks KK for your lovely encouragement. I really appreciate it. Though visit my blog again, there are many more stories here, some of which I am sure you will like. I write and publish one story every weekend. I only miss writing if I am travelling.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. KK says:

        You’re welcome, my friend. I’ll definitely read other stories as well. Your way of writing has impressed me.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        So happy for this, I look forward to your comments.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Beautiful and engaging story.
    Honestly, after reading your story, I realised how lonely a boatman’s life must be. We enjoy our boat rides along the rivers, whenever we visit. But, for them it’s a regular routine, looking at the waters, all around them, all the time.
    Thank you for sharing another great story.

    Liked by 10 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Yes Chitrangada, you are right by saying that a boatman’s life might be lonely, however, some people can find a life in loneliness. Thank you so much for liking my story. Really appreciate your comment.

      Liked by 3 people

  9. Great story! It’s sad anyone would be pursued so inhumanely. This goes to show that it may take years for the reason to manifest as to why we exist. We all exist for a reason.

    Liked by 8 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Always look forward to your comment. You have constantly motivated me. Yes, you are right, we all do exist for a reason, but many a time we fail to realise it, or even overlook living it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I like your stories, they always have a moral lesson behind them.
        Hmmm, I never thought of that, that we might many a time we fail to realize our reason for existing, or even overlook living it.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        I treasure your feedback and our friendship. Thanks for being such a great fan of my writing, if I may say so.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I too treasure the friendship and your writings. Your writings are great. They teaches a lot about another country other than my own. 🙂

        Liked by 6 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        Will try my best to bring out more good stories in the days to come.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Thank you. I think many people enjoy them. 🙂

        Liked by 4 people

  10. elvira797mx says:

    Trishikh, congratulations!
    Always your written is amazing! Thanks for share your creativity, and great storys.
    Take care
    Elvira

    Liked by 8 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Elvira always appreciate you liking my stories.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. elvira797mx says:

        Thanks Trishikh, for your kindness, it´s a pleassure.
        Elvira

        Liked by 5 people

  11. …and the boat man found his purpose of living. Simple yet entertaining story! TQ!

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      So glad you liked it. Yes I tried to keep it simple, but was not sure, whether the history was a bit too much. I am happy with it though.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You could simplify that part. 👍

        Liked by 5 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Yes I would try to do that for my Stories in future.

        Liked by 2 people

  12. Trishikh, I really enjoy reading your stories, it’s like a book I open at some times and looking forward for the next chapter. The boat man’s soul is filled with compassion taking on these people in need.

    Liked by 9 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I am honoured Anna. It means a lot. I really want my readers to feel the way you do and read my stories as you do.

      Like

  13. The story shows well that he had found his purpose in life! 👍🙏🙏🙏

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      That’s what I wanted to convey a positive message and ending.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Saparza says:

    Very nice & impressive!

    Liked by 9 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much.

      Like

  15. This is a lovely vignette, and would make a great full length novel. You write beautifully.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you do much for liking the photo and the story. You are right, actually all my stories can be made into novels, however I have decided to dedicate myself in writing short stories. I want to promote short stories. Though I take your suggestion seriously and perhaps some day write a novel too. I find writing a novel easier, where there is more space to express oneself, but a short story is more challenging in terms of deciding how much to write.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You have a very nice magical realism edge, which I think would translate well into novels or movies.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are so encouraging, who knows maybe some day I will write a novel.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I hope you do!

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        May God give fruition to your words.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Thank you, Trishikh. Peace be with you.

        Liked by 2 people

  16. Another enjoyable read! It is such a glorious place, the Sunderbhans and you have captured that as an extra character! 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Wow! Sundarban a character, did not think of it that way. Thank you so much for sharing this thought with me. Much appreciate your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Haha, yes, it seemed that way to me; with its own rhythm, pace and mood. And the winter mists there just add to the aura. I really enjoy reading your work!

        Liked by 5 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Coming from a great writer and historian like you, it means a lot to me. Your compliment is prescious treasure for me.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. It is sincerely given and deserved! You write well and I look forward to your posts! Stay well, my friend.

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        Thank you so much.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. nedhamson says:

    Reblogged this on Ned Hamson’s Second Line View of the News.

    Liked by 8 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Ned for the reblog.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Halim says:

    Another magical story from you I enjoyed, Trishikh. The foundation was so detailed, I can’t imagine how much research you did to weave in facts and history, it’s all so worth it because so fascinating. And all around the story your writing voice gives it this mist of a fairy tale atmosphere, as gentle as Robi’s boat, and finally leading to the end which yanks me back a bit to the heartbreaking reality of the state of the world for some people.
    Thanks for sharing! Cheers

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I always look forward to your comments. You have rightly analysed the story.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I have saved this post to read later. I have an exam!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      That’s really nice of you Ashwin. Do take your time and read later. Best of luck for your exams.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for appreciating.

      Like

  20. I loved it and want to go back to the history later to read it. I love the truths and following of the heart. I was just wondering the count in India and thought is was 5 million. Is that right? 🙏

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Cindy, so glad that you liked my story. Yes for me also nothing beats truth and following of the heart. Are you asking about COVID count, it is around 12 million as of today. If you mean population – India has 1.3+ billion people.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I sure did! 💖

        Liked by 2 people

  21. You’re so welcome..! I totally agree. Oh my goodness….. how about in your state?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      There are a lot of cases coming up. Let’s hope and pray for the best. Lockdowns have been brought back in few of the states.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Irt ain’t over til it’s over as they say.
        Oh boy I’m hearing about the lockdowns. Prays all around! 💖

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Yes, let’s pray, take necessary safety precautions and hope for the best.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Totally agree!
        👏👏👏

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you Rajani, so happy that you like my story.

      Like

      1. It’s my pleasure

        Liked by 2 people

  22. rainnbooks says:

    Impressive storytelling, ❤️

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. Really appreciate your appreciation.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. I really enjoy reading your stories, it’s like a book I open at some times and looking forward for the next chapter. The boat man’s soul is filled with compassion taking on these people in need.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Reading your comment at the end of the day 00:00 hours in India, totally unexpected, not only makes my day but reaffirms my dedication to keep on writing these stories. Thank you my friend for creating perhaps a butterfly effect in a writers life.

      Like

  24. I must say the story was worth the wait! Thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      My pleasure Aashwin. So glad that you liked the story.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. This was amazing!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Snigdha.

      Like

  26. A great story this is
    Wow

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Am glad that you like it.

      Like

  27. I have read the name Robi somewhere which was used for a pet dog.

    Robi is so simple, kind and human. He is deeply connected with the river, mangroves and it’s creatures. I wonder how someone can live his whole life in the water.

    Robi has a great significance for the govt officials because he give them important information which he only knows.

    Robi is the savior of the refugee family. I hope Robi and his new friends will be enjoying a happy life after this event.

    “ Migration and refugees ” is a big issue. I have read books and stories on this topic. I’m aware of it and I motivate people of the world to understand and accept each other. The roots of migration lies in the recognition/hometown of refugees.

    It was a wonderful read Trishikh. I wonder how beautifully you have described the mangroves and sundarban region. I appreciate your work and it helped to understand this particular region in a better way. Thank you. Keep writing.😊❤️👌✍🏻🙏

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Lokesh you have analysed and summed up my story very precisely. I thank you for this thoughtful review. The refugee crisis is indeed a grave problem in this world and it will always be there. So countries need to come up with better solutions to handle it. A lot of progress has been made in the field, however, a lot more remains to be done, like with many other issues of social development.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m paying my rent for my room in Varanasi for one year. As you know I can not return them because of COVID-19 and neither I can leave the room because it’ll be very difficult to get another one.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Things will work out ultimately. God only tests us to make us better. Many years later, you would very much treasure the memories of these struggling days.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Yes Trishikh.😊💪

        Liked by 2 people

  28. chattykerry says:

    That was a deeply moving story about one of life’s tragedies. I loved the happy ending although I know it doesn’t usually work out like that. Great writing.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Reading your comment early morning really makes my day. Thank you so much for appreciating my story. Yes, I know happy endings do not always happen in real life, but we can always expect them. Afterall the world moves on hope.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. chattykerry says:

        I come from a family of migrants so I can testify to happy stories. We moved from Ireland to Scotland and on the other side from Mexico to California. Then there were all the other ancestors who migrated to the early colonies in the 1700s. My native Mexican ancestors came from across the ice crossing from China/Siberia.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        In our family too there is history of disbursement. I get what you are saying. Thank you for liking my story. Comments such as these makes writing the story worthwhile.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. chattykerry says:

        It is wonderful to read a post that is written from the heart. Grammatically excellent, too!!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        Thak you Kerry. I try my best. With encouragement from friends like you I am sure I will become even better.

        Liked by 1 person

  29. Ananda says:

    An outstanding narration of a beautiful story

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for liking Anand. Your appreciation will act a fuel to my writing engine.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Laleh Chini says:

    Amazing as always. If you are interested I can email you my book ‘Soroosh’ for your review. Let me know.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Oh sure I would love to do that. You can send me an email on my contact page in the following link: https://storynookonline.com/contact/

      Just leave a line, I will email back to you, so that you can send me the book.

      I do not want to write my email id in an open coment here, as nowadays there are a lot of spammers, who can pick up an email from a comment and bombard you with unnecessary emails.

      Please contact me, I look forward to it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Laleh Chini says:

        Thanks dear. Sure.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        I look forward to it Laleh.

        Liked by 1 person

  31. denise421win says:

    Your descriptions are so nicely written

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you Denise, always look forward to your comments and appreciation.

      Like

  32. haoyando says:

    Great post and I thoroughly enjoy reading this story, especially the historical part. I wish there are more history in it. LOL. Around the end of WWII, many regions in Asia went through border issues, many of which still linger. For thousands of years, people live there with no problem, but suddenly artificial borders had to be drawn and inhuman methods had to be enforced and same people had to be divided. Sigh. Let’s pray for more imaginative politics and solutions…

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for your thoughtful review of my story. I completely agree with you, we need imaginative political solutions, which transcends beyond human greed. I think money is the root cause of many problems, when humans would learn to develop a community in which money does not exist, and people provide services and goods to each other in exchange of the same perhaps humans would evolve beyond their cruelty. Just a thought.

      Like

  33. Indira says:

    Wonderful story!! Rather I should say, wonderful narration of the incidents…not story!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you Indira, much appreciate you liking the story and the incident.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. great writing. I am going to have to work my way through your stories. Glad I finally got in to look about.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I am so honoured and extremely happy for this. So glad that you like my stories. Do take your time and visit whenever you feel like reading a short story. I try to write and release one story every weekend. Happy reading. Must say I liking your posts and stories too. I specially love the photography.

      Like

  35. Sunith says:

    Good story mixed with old and modern history

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Sunith for liking it. It really makes my day. Yes! It is one of my styles to blend in different timespans.

      Like

      1. Sunith says:

        You are most welcome. I will spend some time on your other stories and let you know Trishikh.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        I would be highly honoured.

        Liked by 1 person

  36. Wow! So much research and detail!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Vanya. Yes research is a big part of my writing. It gives me a lot of enjoyment.

      Liked by 1 person

  37. malaikamuses says:

    This was such a beautiful piece giving hope to people who find their life useless, one can come to realise his purpose at the most hopeless time all we need to do is to keep rowing our boats well. 🙏

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Wow! What a lovely ode to my story. Thank you so much Malaika for this heartfelt, sincere, and indept review. You are right, we should never lose hope about finding our one true calling or ultimate purpose in life. Many of us simply do not know when the moment will come, but we need to be prepared for it.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. maayaronweg says:

    One is better than other! Keep up that great work!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. So happy that you find my stories interesting.

      Like

  39. Asgar Molla says:

    Wow! So much research and detail ! excellent post!!!…….https://bit.ly/3wU5wrr

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you Asgar. Always a pleasure to receive your appreciation.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Asgar Molla says:

        You welcome my friend

        Liked by 1 person

  40. Subhraroy says:

    Decent matchless copyright

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Subhra. Glad you liked it.

      Like

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