The Gatekeeper

Neither very far from the hustle-bustle of the Kolkata city nor very deep in the lap of the South 24 Parganas rural landscape stood an ageing gated community, the Adidham Housing Complex. It was developed in the year 1937, a decade prior to Indian independence. At the time of its inception, the project was a hallmark of the twentieth-century community residence. Now in the year 2000 much had changed from the original vision of its creators after sixty-three years of its existence.

Most of the individual cottages now stood abandoned with rusted locks hanging on their wrought-iron picket gates. The once lush and colourful mini-gardens within the white wooden fences of each of the little houses now lay overgrown with wild vegetation and barb nettles. While unhinged doors and windows flopped with the wind night and day, plaster pealed brick revealing walls greeted bats and critters who had become the new residents.

Now such a lucrative realty fell on the radar of many preying business houses. Amongst all of them, Choski Developers, a fast-growing and new property dealer and construction company, showed the keenest interest to acquire this massive real estate.

The office of Choski went to great lengths to track down the descendants of the original owners and bought off most of the little cottages. They could not, however, track down the family of just one of the houses, which was burnt down during the communal riots of 1947. It was a problem, which they could not figure out how to eliminate.

For the handful of the remaining residents, who did not want to sell their houses, Choski set in place many tactics to force them to evacuate. Right from disturbing peace and tranquillity to even threatening their lives, hoodlums hired by Choski did everything to acquire the place. Only a one-legged old man and his six feet hickory fighting stick stood as a menacing force against them.

The demise of this once-thriving community was mainly due to the downfall of industrial activities in the region. Bengal was once British India’s most industrialised domain – a powerhouse of the Empire’s wealth. Sadly, when the colonial oppressors were finally forced to leave the county, in an ultimate vindictive move fueled by their divide-and-rule policy, they split the country into two on the basis of religion.

The majority of this ancient country’s landmass in the middle now became the Republic of India dominated by the Hindu’s and the northwest and northeast regions became the predominantly Muslim country of Pakistan. To form this new country, the British had to divide the two mighty states of Punjab in the West and Bengal in the East.

With this Partition of Bengal, along with the bloody riots and unfathomable famines came the downfall of industry in the region. A blow, which the state never really overcame. Dependence on only a few industries like jute, mining, and tea without the foresight of diversification further ensured this industrial ruin.

Most of the original owners of the cottages of the Adidham Housing Complex, who were employees of the factories in the region, had gradually migrated to other places in search of a better existence. Sadly, the exodus of these families was mostly abrupt. Some were killed during the blood-soaked riots following the partition, while others simply had to move on to survive. Now, after six decades, only a few of the original cottages remained occupied.

The one-legged octogenarian Bashded Dolui was the last surviving man living in the complex who had been a part of this community from the very beginning. All of the few other remaining residents were second and third-generation owners of the houses. The oldtimer did not own any of the cottages he was but an employee of the place. He resided in a small quarter of five by ten feet beside the main entrance of the complex.

For many years he had not received any salary. There was no system in place to pay him, yet he continued with his duties, nevertheless. In 1937, the twenty-year-old orphan Bashdeb thanked the Gods for granting him the job of a gatekeeper at the newly constructed Adidham Housing Complex. More than the job, he was happy to experience the feeling of belonging to a family, which he found with the residents.

Since that day, he never looked for anything else but made it his heart’s desire and life’s mission to care for the people of the place. He lost his left leg, saving a little boy from a burning house back in the communal riots of 1947. Though old and disabled, he was strong as an ox, agile as a fox, pretty fit and moved extremely well with a wooden prosthetic left leg.

Bashdeb always carried a six feet hickory fighting stick, with which he performed much of his sentinel duties. Right from switching streetlights to chasing thieves and hoodlums, his trusted hickory fighting stick always sufficed. It was the only thing that the goons of the Choski Developers feared and ran from to save their dear lives.

Now at the dusk of his life, it grieved Bashded much to see his beloved adopted family, his loving housing complex, in its last dying phase. Throughout his life, he had done much to save and upkeep the place. Unfortunately, what could the efforts of a single old sentinel do to stop the multi-factored demise of such a large place?

He was strong and determined, but for how long could he keep the goons of Choski at bay. After all, he was a single man and could not be present all the time at every corner of this massive complex.

With time his confrontation with the miscreants hired by the Choski Developers increased to pretty disturbing levels. The residents, however, knew that as long as Bashdeb was alive, no harm would come to them.

One day a silver-coloured Mercedes Benz E-Class screeched and halted in front of the main gate of the Adidham Housing Complex. A short and stout chauffeur in a neat white safari suit and a large wobbly scally cap hopped out of the driver’s seat and ran on his tiny legs. Circling the long car from its front side, he hurried to open the back left passenger door of the pompous automobile to let out its imposing occupant.

A tall and dark well-groomed man in a blue suit came down from the E-Class and walked towards the main gate. From the Toyota Fortuner SUV that stopped behind the Merc came down four henchmen with Glock 17s holstered on their hips, ready to discharge their weapons at the whim of their master at any moment.

“Do I have to do everything myself now,” sighed the master? “It’s been a year since I had my eyes on this place. How will I build my ultimate hotel and resort here if you buffoons are unable to acquire the gasping property in the first place,” bellowed the man stomping his foot on the ground, causing his gargantuan henchmen to tremble?

It was clear that this was no ordinary businessman to mess with. The orphan Ram Charan Choski had risen through the ashes of poverty and hardships. He had literally fought his way through the world, gaining ground inch by inch, moving from one business to the next till he had established the ‘Choski Developers Property Dealers and Construction Company.’ Now his next big plan was to enter into the hotel and resort business and for that, he had to acquire the Adidham Housing Complex.

“I want to see the whole property for myself and visit each of the owners who have refused to sell but first take me to the one house, whose owners you clowns have not been able to track down till date,” roared Ram Charan to his pot-bellied dhoti-kurta-clad assistant Chitragupt who until now was hiding behind the wall of henchmen.

“S-s-s-sir, that one house is nearly burnt to the ground and in r-r-r-ruins. N-n-n-n-no one lives t-t-t-there. A-a-a-are you s-s-s-sure you want to go t-t-t-there,” stuttered Chitragupt in a trembling voice.

“I will make you eat the ashes of the burnt cottage and make you tell me the name of the owner you fool. Keep your trap shut and take me there this very instance I say,” shouted his master barely controlling his rage.

“S-s-s-strong old m-m-m-man, s-s-s-stick, d-d-d-death,” mumbled Chirtagupt. Right at the brink of losing his patience, Ram Charan took a long and deep breath to calm his nerve and spoke slowly in a most eery way and said, “take me to the burnt cottage right now or I will cut your tongue, shove it inside you from your unpleasant end and bury you alive on the very spot you stand at this very moment.”

Without saying another word Chitragupt tiptoed forward, looking over his shoulders now and then clearly afraid of something or rather someone perhaps more menacing than his master, one could say. Ram Charan and his goons followed till they came in front of an old and charred skeletal of a cottage, which had been engulfed by fire fifty-three years ago on a dark and horrifying day.

Ram Charan kept on staring at the charred cottage, standing speechless without moving a single muscle. All scared and alert, Chitragupt moved behind from one henchman to the next, instructing them to be ready with the weapons. “B-b-b-be ready you f-f-f-fools, beware of the s-s-s-sentinel. D-d-d-don’t underestimate the old m-m-m-man. A-a-a-a single blow from his stick can crack open your melons, and it would be your e-e-e-end,” uttered the fearful assistant.

At that very moment, from behind the burnt cottage came the sound of a wooden stick striking the ground with its wielder’s every step. The old sentinel slowly emerged through the ruined house to stand in front of Ram Charan, Chitragupt and the armed henchmen.

“S-s-s-shoot, s-s-s-shoot, s-s-s-shoot before it’s too l-l-l-late. D-d-d-don’t let him lift his s-s-s-stick,” screamed Chitragupt, shaking in fear. “Don’t worry sir, his stick is no match for our Glocks. Our bullets will cut him down before he even moves a muscle,” said one of the henchmen with great confidence, as he and the other three drew their pistols.

“STOP EVERYONE! Lower your weapons,” screamed Ram Charan and moved towards Bashdeb. The old man’s grasp on the hickory tightened as he readied himself for the seemingly inevitable. Chitragupt and the henchmen now knew that their master had decided to take the matter into his own hands. They knew Ram Charan was not just any money counting businessman. He was a strong and menacing fighter, and it seemed he had decided to end the old man with his bare hands all by himself.

The old man did not flinch. He was at the end of his days and knew that he had nothing else to live for. His life would be worthy if he gave it up trying to save the only family he ever had.

The warrior-businessman of the present now stood face-to-face with the ancient sentinel with a foot of distance in between them. Chitragupt closed his eyes, he was uncertain of the outcome but knew there would be blood in the end. The henchmen though had lowered their weapons, had not holstered them yet.

As Ram Charan slowly raised both of his hands Bashdeb lifted his stick an inch above the ground. Before the old man could make his move, the businessman fell on his knees and clasped his raised hands in a namaste. No one could believe what just happened. How did the unflinching and menacing Ram Charan lower his head in front of a mere gatekeeper of a dying complex?

“Forgive me kaka (uncle) for all my trespasses. I did not know whom I had come to fight with. My life is only a gift from you, which you saved from the fire fifty-three years ago,” said Ram Charan as tears rolled down his face.

“Right at the moment when I came and stood in front of this charred house, a floodgate of memory started flowing back into my brain. Then seeing you cleared any doubts that I might have had in my head. This was my house, my parents’ house. We lived happily till one terrifying night back in 1947 when rioters came and burnt this home of ours and killed my parents,” cried Ram Charan now holding Bashdeb’s feet with his hands.

“It was you who saved me from the rioters and the fire that day. I had forgotten all this in time, as I became too focused on survival moving on from one orphanage to another to juvenile correctional facilities to jails, trailing a life of violence and cons till I became the businessman you see kneeling in front of you today,” continued Ram Charan as droplets of his tears caressed the old man’s leather sandals.

Bashdeb lifted Ram Charan and hugged him saying, “don’t worry my child you are back in your home now. You are not an orphan. Like me, you too will always have a family with the residents of the Adidham Housing Complex.”

Over the course of the next year, Ram Charan took it up as his topmost project to restore the Adidham Housing Complex and return the deeds of the cottages to all the owners that his men had painstakingly found out. He restored his burnt home and gave its key to Bashdeb to live in it for the remainder of his days.

The old sentinel, however, refused to stay in the cottage and continued to live in his small quarter of five by ten feet beside the main entrance of the complex. He still goes about performing his gatekeeper duties moving around on his wooden prosthetic legs, wielding his trusted six feet hickory fighting stick, which still today stands as a menacing force against anyone daring to lift an eye against his family of the Adidham Housing Complex.

The Gatekeeper


Copyright © 2021 TRISHIKH DASGUPTA

This work of fiction, written by Trishikh Dasgupta is the author’s sole intellectual property. All rights are reserved. No part of this story may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including printing, photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, send an email to the author at trishikh@gmail.com or get in touch with Trishikh on the CONTACT page of this website.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Trishikh

Trishikh Dasgupta

Adventurer, philosopher, writer, painter, photographer, craftsman, innovator, or just a momentary speck in the universe flickering to leave behind a footprint on the sands of time..READ MORE

119 Comments Add yours

  1. Goff James says:

    Thank you, Trishikh, for another wonderful story.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      It’s my pleasure Goff. So happy that you liked my story. Treasure your constant support.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Goff James says:

        Pleasure. Great Read. Best Regards.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Thank you Goff.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. ybrwrites says:

    It been long time since I have read you stories. As usually it was wonderful story..YBR

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I always treasure your comment. Thank you so much for your encouragement. Really appreciate it.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. I hope that the encounter introduced kindness to Ram Charan. Such a beautiful story!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Yes Shweta, I think the encounter changed Ram Charan’s heart. Thank you so much for liking my story.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Me too. You are welcome 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Arpita Banerjee says:

    An amazing one as always!! ✨✨🌼

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Arpita. Always look forward to your appreciation.

      Like

  5. ahiricreates says:

    Such a pure piece! Genuinely loved reading it!! Thanks for sharing it with all of us ❤️❤️

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are most welcome. It’s my pleasure to share this story with the world. So glad that you find the story pure.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. ahiricreates says:

        It’s beautiful ❤️

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Michael Sammut says:

    Excellent story with a perfect twist in the end. My sincere compliments.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Oh! Thank you so much for your kind words. They encourage me a lot to keep on writing.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Michael Sammut says:

        You should. Waiting for more 👍

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        I publish 1 story every weekend, though last month I could not stick to the deadline. Do visit again, when you have time, there many more stories here, some of which I am sure you would love.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Bob says:

    Wonderful!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Bob.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. nedhamson says:

    Good story, thank you. I have just such a hickory stick. Before I started using it, I was accosted twice. Since then, would-be attackers cross over to the other side of the road. Grin.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Wow, I found a real like Bashdeb in you, for the fighting stick part of it. Grin…

      Like

  9. katelon says:

    What a sweet story. Colonialism and the stealing of land around the world has been such a tragic and violent history of this planet.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      That is true, however, many people of the same colonialising countries have also done so much for the oppressed nation. I think it’s a mix of good and bad like everything else. Saying that nothing can ever excuse the attrocities committed in the name of colonisation. You are right!

      Liked by 2 people

  10. I joined world press few months back… your channel was among the first few I followed…. And believe me I’m happy I followed uh soo that I can read these beautiful stories….
    Sooooooo beautiful 🌸🌸✨
    But please write stories soon…I wait for your writings…
    🌻🌻🌻🌻

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Deepika thank you so much for this heartwarming comment. I try to write and publish one story every weekend, however Last month (July) I could only publish one story as I was travelling. This month again due to job pressure I have been able to write just one story, however, from tomorrow I will write irrespective of all the hardships. I cannot let down my readers. Look forward to the next story, next weekend. In the meanwhile you can read some of my older stories, which are really great, however, have less liked, as in the beginning I had less followers.

      Like

      1. For sure sir..✨✨🌼🌼

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Good one dear Trishikh 🤝
    I loved the end, great job. Thanks for sharing ❤️

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Your comment greatly encourages me. Yes, I am satisfied with the ending too. Somehow it just clicked.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. What a beautiful picture of sacrificial living. “I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship” (Romans 12: 1).

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      The Good Book has helped to form my metal and provides constant moral inspiration.

      Like

  13. eunice says:

    Great history. Long story, not much lengthy in a paragraph 👌.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Eunice. Yes my stories are around 2,000 words. Easy for the voracious reader and not too hard to finish for the newbie.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Saparza says:

    Wonderful one !

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. Glad that you liked the story.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. nedhamson says:

    Reblogged this on Ned Hamson’s Second Line View of the News.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Ned for reblogging this story of mine. Always treasure the support.

      Like

  16. Very nice and heartfelt story. It’s always satisfying to see kind and helpful people, getting acknowledged for their good deeds. I feel good for Bashdeb.
    Thank you for sharing another wonderful story.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      The pleasure is all mine. Appreciation from friends like you makes writing these stories worthwhile.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. A marvelous heroic and heart-felt story!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      So glad that the story appealed to you. Thank you so much for appreciating it.

      Like

  18. Trishikh, I really love reading your stories, you are such a talented story writer. Thank you for sharing your talent with the world. Have a wonderful inspiring week.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you Cornelia for your beautiful words. I am grateful to God for blessings me with this gift of storytelling, and what good is my talent if I bury it and do not share widely with the world. I believe any knowledge can only find its ultimate purpose when shared with others. Maybe someday I will publish a book and perhaps make some money, but that’s not my goal. That Is why I have kept my website ad free and want my friends to enjoy a read without any digital clutter.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for your wonderful response . I believe when the time is right your talent as a great writer will be recognized by some publishers . It’s all a matter what you wish for for in your mind.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        May your words come true Cornelia. For now I have already gained so much through friends like you who constantly read, appreciate, and enjoy my stories. That is already a big reward for me.

        Liked by 2 people

  19. A heart moving story that brought tears to my eyes. One is instantly taken in by the stories timeless simplicity in style and realism.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Wow, what a comment. I never thought this story could move someone so much. Your comment makes my day. Thank you so much.

      Like

  20. mcurry09 says:

    Very sweet. Would you call this “karma” in your country?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Yes, Marthe, this is certainly Karma you can say. The result of one’s deeds – sometimes it is experienced in the same lifetime and sometimes in another.

      Like

  21. Subhraroy says:

    Heart touching story of Adidham complex and the sincere gatekeeper Bashdeb. But at present age do such incidents ever occur?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Well Subhra, I am sure both good and evil exists all the time all around us. So hopefully in this present day world of our’s good still exists. So such incidents might occur.

      Like

  22. Johnny Jones says:

    Hi Trishikh, you mentioned older stories and that is where I will be looking now….as always I love your writing. Take care

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. Always a pleasure to hear from you.

      Like

  23. Nicely woven !interesting !excellent story!!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. So glad that you liked my story.

      Like

  24. KK says:

    One more interesting story with twists. The character of Bashdeb is really good. This story came a bit late, but it was worth waiting.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Yes, KK, I have been travelling in July and August along with a lot of work pressure. I could not hold on to my weekend deadline for writing short stories. Hopefully I am back on track again. Next story this comming weekend.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. KK says:

        So nice of you, Trishikh. All the best to you 👍

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Thank you KK.

        Liked by 1 person

  25. A wonderful story!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Dawn for being ever-appreciative of my stories.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Sunith says:

    Loved this story & how well you set it up, Trishikh

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you Sunith. So glad that you find my story appealing.

      Like

      1. Sunith says:

        My pleasure Trishikh

        Liked by 1 person

  27. Terveen Gill says:

    Memories from the past come flooding back. I think gratitude is one of the greatest powers humans have, yet they refrain from using or practicing it. You really set the reader on a grim path before twisting it towards a positive ending. Great detailing and wonderful narrative. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Tanveer. You are absolutely right about gratitude – there is so much power in it, yet driven by false ego and inflated pride we are not ready to use it. Yes, this story like few other stories of mine does have a grim to Joyous progression. Thank you so much for always liking my stories and commenting so kindly.

      Like

  28. Priti says:

    Excellent story like a movie . Didn’t stop reading it. Thank you very much 😊😊😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Oh, you are too kind with your appreciation. Treasure your compliment. Thank you so much.

      Like

      1. Priti says:

        🙂👌❤️🌹❣️🤗👍

        Liked by 1 person

  29. thatodiaboy says:

    Good one Trishikh!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. So glad that you like it.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Sono restio a seguire i blog stranieri perché le traduzioni sono pessime, questa è veramente ben fatta.

    Liked by 3 people

  31. Kally says:

    Amazing story.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Kally. So elated that you liked my little tale.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for appreciating the story. I think you will also like my story Ramkingkong as it has a resemblance to your blog name. You can read the story here: https://storynookonline.com/2020/09/05/ramkingkong/

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Really appreciate your appreciation. Thank you so much.

      Like

  32. usfman says:

    An improbable hero makes this story a special one to read. I’m also gaining some important history about your country.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I am so glad that you are gaining some info about India through my stories. That really makes me happy. I think stories are the window to the world. Thank you so much for liking my tales.

      Like

  33. Diti Sen says:

    You’re most welcome.😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. usfman says:

      I have a friend who’s hiked through the Himalayas converses in your language, and shares stories like yours. Both of you feed my continued interest in India.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        That is such a good thing. Lucky are those who get to see the Himalayas and it’s neighbouring regions. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity that one should never miss. India as a whole is very interesting, no doubts about that. Thousands of years of ancient history, as possible geographies, thousands of cultures – one will always be fascinated with it.

        Liked by 1 person

  34. Diti Sen says:

    I started reading this, thinking it was a real life story, it was so convincing. Brought back memories of old retainers and their unfailing loyalty and integrity.The ending had
    a good twist, enjoyed reading this tale.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      It is such an honour and privilege when someone feels that the story is real. I am so thankful for this comment of yours. Yes, this does bring back memories of bygone days of loyal gatekeepers. They have nearly become an extinct breed nowadays.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. usfman says:

      What would be your advice in securing a guide to hike through Himalayas?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Well I am not an expert on the subject. You have to do a thorough research. During my motorcycling days I toured without any guide. Well my case is different from yours. Do a good research before you select someone. You can check out http://www.acevisionnepal.com they have a good blog in WordPress too. I follow them a little, they seem genuine.

        Like

  35. Diti Sen says:

    You’re most welcome. ☺️

    Liked by 2 people

    1. usfman says:

      I’ll check that out. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. What an amazing story.
    I also agree that the partition of India was essentially that of Bengal and Punjab. A loss which has never been fathomed in our narratives.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Parneet. Yes, you are right about the partition. If you are interested in the subject you might also like the real life story of my grandparents “The Crossing” ( https://storynookonline.com/2020/09/19/the-crossing/ ). My grandfather was from present day Pakistan and my grandmother from Bengal. It is a story you are bound to like.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. sure I’ll see it. Thanks a lot

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        It would be my pleasure.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for promoting my story.

      Like

  37. The story takes one to the past, present, and future. Once upon a time the house or bungalow was the trend with a job to a gatekeeper for 24*7*365. The sense of belongingness was very strong. Then came the competition of higher education and kids started moving out and away thus leaving their aging parents. Some could not take care of both themselves and their beautiful houses which lost all charms. It’s hard when parents who took care of us and the home which gave us everything is left behind. The vertical growth is talk of the future as there is not enough land and lots many singular families everyone looking for a place to call theirs. This gives birth to a new professional called builders who are there to have his big dreams filled by driving the best of the best cars and bodyguard to show the power. I was going high and then you gave a good parachute to come down by such a beautiful twist.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Wow, what a thoughtful comment. You really went deep into the story. Even thought more than I did while writing the story. You are right about the evolution of modern day housing and it’s associated evils. Children leaving parents are another sad reality of our times. Thank you so much for taking the time to give such an in-depth review of my little story. Always treasure your thoughts.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Wayan says:

    The Stutter man is funny, reminds me of funny bollywood movies. but no offend to stutter people in reality. thank you Trishikh for this post. I enjoy it so much

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      So nice to hear from you Wayan. So glad that you liked my story. Yes, I intentionally used the stuttering character Chitragupta to bring in a bit of comic relief in this serious story.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Wayan says:

        Yes Trishikh, you nailed it i laughed reading Chitragupta part.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        My pleasure Wayan to have been able to bring a little smile on someone’s face.

        Liked by 2 people

  39. lesleyscoble says:

    Love this tale of irony. Wonderful characterisation. Would make a great short film.

    Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      So kind of you Lesley. Thank you so much for appreciating. Yes indeed, many of my short stories can be made into short films. Maybe someday, someone would show interest. My aim is to keep on writing as many as possible in my lifetime.

      Liked by 2 people

  40. Singh Lovely says:

    How Amazing 😍

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for liking my story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Singh Lovely says:

        You are most welcome ☺️

        Liked by 1 person

  41. Loved how engaging and the life this story carried. Beautifully written. ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Really appreciate your appreciation. So glad that you loved the story.

      Liked by 2 people

  42. A beautiful story… something told me Ram Charan was going to be the boy who was saved from the fire… but fore knowledge did not dampen the joy the story gave me… again… a beautiful story…
    🇯🇲🌅

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Your words gives me great joy. You are the first person who told me that he could guess the origin of Ram Charan’s character.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is something that hits me on the head sometimes, when I run ahead of the story… this time it wasn’t a hit… it was a couple off pats…
        🇯🇲🌅

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are awesome. I commend your intuition. You are gifted with that I must say. Look forward to you visiting some more of my stories, when you get the time.

        Liked by 1 person

  43. A beautiful story of love, commitment, and honor. Thank you for posting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      So happy that you find this story moving. As you right say – after all what are we without love, commitment, and honour – just empty souls resonating with hollowness.

      Liked by 1 person

  44. What a beautiful story. It touched my heart. Thank you for sharing it with us.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      It is my pleasure Rozina to share this story with everyone. Thank you for your lovely words of encouragement. It gives me great joy.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. You’re very welcome.

        Liked by 2 people

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