Soul Of A Gorkha

The ten-year-old Tau sat in front of a glowing charcoal hearth under the cold moonlit night sky in a small and obscure village in the foothills of the mighty Himalayas in the ancient land of Nepal. His father pulled out a glowing piece of steel from the burning embers and hammered it on an old anvil. Seven decades had passed since then, and Tau still remembered the warmth of the freshly forged knife that his father had just quenched in the chilling waters of the nearby river and placed in his hands.

“This is yours for life, a trusted companion you will always treasure. Use it well and wield it wisely. It will help you build, provide food and safety, and enable you to stand up against the worst of adversaries. Always use it to do good to yourself and others. Never use it on anyone who means no harm. The Kukri is the soul of a Gorkha. How you use it, will determine who you are and what you will be,” said his father.

The little boy of ten was now an old man of eighty. He had not accomplished much in life but had never failed to live by the code of honour taught by his father. He knew that the dreadful night ahead would be the ultimate test of his metal. Tau tightly clenched the weathered water buffalo horn handle of his aged Kukri. He knew that if he drew it out of the scabbard that night, he had to be ready to shed blood.

The Gorkha Kingdom took its name from the eleventh-century medieval Hindu warrior-saint Guru Gorakhnath, who is believed, to have retreated from human company to a little hill near Deo Patan, where he meditated in an unmovable state for twelve years. After ascending to the throne in 1743 AD, Maharaja Prithvi Narayan Shah dedicated his life to the unification of Nepal. Within a short span of the next thirty-two years, he carved out the Kingdom of Nepal as its first monarch from this very Gorkha Kingdom hill principality, of which he was the last king.

Tau closed his eyes and listened to the noises coming from outside. He and a few other kids hid in the small storeroom under the stairs. Most of the other children huddled together in fear in the centre of the main dining hall. There was no escape for them from those who had crept into their home that day. They combed the house to flush out anyone who might have hidden and escaped.

The Gorkhas came from a rich tradition of military history. During the Anglo-Nepalese War of 1814-1816, the British realised the fierce potential of the Gorkha in the military. In 1815, under the initiative of Major-general Sir David Ochterlony, 5,000 natives, who were not just Gorkhalis, but Kumaonis, Garhwalis, and other Himalayan hill tribe men, joined the British East India Company Army. These groups eventually came to be, collectively known as the Gorkha, the backbone of the British Indian military.

Since then, Gorkha units of Nepalis have been recruited for the Nepali Army, Indian Army, British Army, Gurkha Contingent Singapore, Gurkha Reserve Unit Brunei, UN peacekeeping forces and in war zones around the world. Under the British Indian Army, they actively served in Burma, Afghanistan, Northeast India and the North-West Frontier of India, Malta (the Russo-Turkish War, 1877–78), Cyprus, Malaya, China (the Boxer Rebellion of 1900) and Tibet (Younghusband’s Expedition of 1905).

“Will we die tonight, Tau,” sobbed a little girl as she hugged the old man around his thighs? “Fear is good, tiny one, it keeps us alert in the face of danger. Stay hidden and don’t make any noise. No one will harm any of you until I am alive,” said the wrinkled Nepali, patting the child on her shoulder to comfort her and the four other children cramped in the little room that dreadful night.

During World War 1, more than two hundred thousand Gorkhas served in the British Army, suffering twenty thousand casualties, and receiving over two thousand gallantry awards. They also fought on the battlefields of France, Turkey, Palestine, and Mesopotamia. During the unsuccessful Gallipoli Campaign in 1915, the Gorkhas were among the first to arrive and the last to leave. They fought in the Afghan War of 1919, participated in numerous campaigns on the North-West Frontier, mainly in Waziristan, against the Pathan tribesman, and partook in the Second World War, etching their names as one of the fiercest warrior clans in the annuls of human history.

Tau’s grandfather, father, uncles, and brothers fought in these wars. Unfortunately, he could never make it to the army. He was very nearsighted and almost blind without his thick ebony-rimmed spectacles. Though his poor vision did not allow him to join the army, it heightened his other senses of touch, sound, and smell.

The Sacred Heart Home was located on a tranquil and remote hillock close to the town of Darjeeling in the state of West Bengal. In the year 1980, around thirty orphans called this little piece of heavenly paradise their earthly abode. A seventy-year-old Anglo-Indian widow, Mrs Dufferin owned and ran the orphanage along with a skeletal staff of five local men and women. The home was in a gasping stage. There were hardly any funds and no stable source of income to run the place. Little donations from ageing patrons somehow sustained the establishment.

The orphans of the home were Tau’s family. For the last sixty years, he had dedicated his life to guarding the gates of this humble establishment. After failing the Gorkha recruitment a few times, he had sought a livelihood as a security guard at the place. Though the pay was not that great, and there was hardly any glory compared to serving in the military, Tau took much pride in protecting the abandoned little residents of the orphanage.

The past six decades of his life as a security guard had given him great joy but had failed to provide him with a chance to prove his true grit. Tonight, it seemed, however, different. Perhaps it was a single chance to stand true to the Gorkha name in his December days.

Though old, Tau was strong and remarkably agile for his age. Perhaps health and longevity were in his genes, or maybe it was simply the pristine environment of the Himalayas that prolonged his healthy existence. Whatever the case, he was not just some old man to be messed with. Though he moved slowly, mainly due to his nearsightedness and the occasional pains in his joints, he was fast and nimble when the situation demanded.

Tau slept on a small foldable iron camp bed in the tiny storeroom under the stairs. That day for some reason, he had a deeper slumber than usual. He would have slept through the night if not suddenly woken up by the five children who dashed into his room. Stricken with fear, they hugged him for refuge.

Screams of children from the main dining hall resonated through the creaky wooden floors and walls of the old house. The kids who hid with Tau, covered their faces with their hands to suppress their frightened sobs. It was clear that some terror had fallen on them. “Don’t go out Tau. Those monsters will kill you,” shakily whispered the little girl who hug him around his thighs.

Pinching his eyelids, shrivelling his ears, and placing the palm of his hands on the wooden walls, the old man concentrated to gather information through his heightened senses of touch, smell, and sound. The noises that came from outside and the vibrations of the movements that travelled through the walls gave the old guard a fair idea of where who was. Sadly, he also picked up the distinct smell of blood.

At the right moment, Tau closed the door of the storeroom behind him to step into the battle for which he had waited his entire life. The old guard vanished into the shadows in the hallway, dimly lit by a single flickering lightbulb.

In the incandescent glow of the dying embers from the fireplace in the main dining hall, the children huddled at the centre of the chamber saw the silhouette of a familiar man. It moved fast from shadow to shadow between the moonlit windows till it was a few inches from one of the monsters who was keeping an eye on the children gathered in the middle of the room.

The monster felt a breath of air at the back of its neck, and then a lightning-fast flash of steel zipped below its jaw from right to left. It dropped the large machete from its leather-clad palms and clasped its neck as thick red blood gushed through the mesh of its fingers covering its slit throat. With a damping thud, its large body fell on the wooden floor, it twitched and turned for a few moments till it moved no more, and slowly a pool of blood formed around its lifeless torso.

The old guard moved fast from shadow to shadow, a flash of steel here and a lash of blade there. Lightning-fast slashes and jabs slit and pierced through the darkness making contact with the monsters, felling them one after the other like sugarcane on the floor. They were perplexed. They did not expect any resistance. They did not even get the time to react. One after the other, nine of them fell till there was only one left.

Tau made his way to the first floor, leaving behind a trail of blood and gore. As he entered through the open door of the games room, he saw one of the children lay there dead on the table tennis board. His belly split open, with his innards in the hand of a monster who towered over his tiny corpse. It was this child’s blood whose scent Tau had caught in the storeroom.

Dropping the child’s organs from his hands and picking up a sharp blade from the bloody table tennis board, the monster lunged toward the short old man at the door. Tau lifted his Kukri at the right moment and caught the attacker’s blade in the notch above his weapon’s handle. The monster applied all its force and pinned the old guard against the wooden wall. The monster pushed on, and the tip of its blade came closer and closer to Tau.

At that moment the attacker’s blade broke. The Himalayan steel forged by Tau’s father triumphed. The monster’s knuckles hit the old guard, with the broken blade still clenched in his hand too short to penetrate the old man’s chest. The Kukri, however, cutting through the weaker blade, lodged deep into the skull of the assailant splitting his head. The monster fell to the floor lifeless.

Tau bent down and turned the beast. The Kukri had not only split open his head but had also smashed the wooden mask covering his face. It was just a man, and so were the nine others. They wore scary masks, fur clothes, and leather gloves, which gave them the appearance of some creature.

Besides the bloody Table Tennis board, Tau discovered several thermocol boxes with ice packs, which the men had brought with them. It was clear that they were human organ smugglers, who saw an easy opportunity to harvest the organs of the thirty children in this secluded little orphanage.

A year later in 1981, Tau was awarded the Ashok Chakra, an award equivalent to the US Army’s peacetime Medal of Honour and the British George Cross, given for most conspicuous bravery or some act of daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice away from the battlefield. From that day the old guard always proudly wore his medal on his chest. Of course, he had his blade tucked in his belt. As his father had promised, the tool, the weapon, his trusted Kukri, determined who he was and what he became. The soul of a Gorkha found the ultimate purpose for its existence.

Soul Of A Gorkha


 

Copyright © 2022 TRISHIKH DASGUPTA

This work of fiction, written by Trishikh Dasgupta is the author’s sole intellectual property. Some characters, incidents, places, and facts may be real while some fictitious. All rights are reserved. No part of this story may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including printing, photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, send an email to the author at trishikh@gmail.com or get in touch with Trishikh on the CONTACT page of this website.


 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Trishikh

Trishikh Dasgupta

Adventurer, philosopher, writer, painter, photographer, craftsman, innovator, or just a momentary speck in the universe flickering to leave behind a footprint on the sands of time..READ MORE

153 Comments Add yours

  1. Dear friend Trishikh, what a great and inspiring story! Loved that shocking and enlightening moment the Monsters were revealed to be human organ smugglers – so they were monsters indeed! A natural monster is but a monster, and somewhat innocent, for it is what it is and cannot be otherwise. But a human being, turned monster, is really a monster, for it is a monster out of his or her free will.
    The old warrior is true to his destiny, and he is true out of his free will, also. The knife is a beautiful symbol: the heart of the warrior, the soul of the warrior, all that is good and true. So, the clash between the monsters and the old warrior really is a clash between good and evil, for they all do what they do out of free will.
    Dear frind Trishikh, this is a beautifully crafted story, the story itself resembles that knife: a piece of true craftsmanship, with a soul, and a meaning. As always, you have build a whole world in a few paragraphs. And it is a world with deep perspectives, a world rooted deeply in time and place.
    That old man, fulfilling his destiny! A round and precisely crafted literary symbol, no doubt, but also a figure full of life, full of concretion, of reality. When I read the story, it was almost as if the old man was standing at my side, saying, that’s about me, son, that’s all my life.

    You are a great and gifted author, dear friend, and yours is that touch of innocence and empathy and, to a degree, even naiveté without which no great goal can be achieved, for its the simple and pure heart out of which the great stories are born.

    Must apologize, finally, for my long silence, I was under pressure. Doesn’t matter. Reading your story was like a flash of light and joy. Thanks so much. Your friend Peter

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Peter,

      As always your intricately thought comment gives me so much to think and shows me so many angles in my story, that I myself had perhaps not realised.

      You are very right about a natural monster being innocent to a certain degree, due to its inherent nature. Man however, turned into a monster by its own choices is a manifestation of evil.

      So glad that you liked the character of old man Tau, and his connection with the knife.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. saphilopes says:

    Anzac and gurka soldiers are now entrusted to us, they sleep peacefully in our land. I know Nepal more from the sherpas. They dominate the unbelievable nature and I love the sharpas very much. Stories come to life in lived lands, sprout and fall from the writer’s pen. It was beautiful.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      So glad to learn about the Anzac and Gurkha Soldier in your land. Yes, the Sherpas are a high part of Nepal. Maybe oneday I will write a story on them, though there are many good stories about Sherpas already I am sure. So glad that you liked my tale. Appreciation always work great for my writing engine.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. saphilopes says:

        Evimde Nepal renkli ritüel bayraklar var. Küçük ve ince yazılar var.hepsi çok renkli. Everes dağına çıkan arkadaşım getirdi.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        The Buddhist prayer flags are very common in the region. Nowadays people also put them on their cars and motorbikes in India as well, apart from keeping them in their homes.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. What a wonderfully written story!
    Besides, the message of win of good over evil, your story also highlights the origin of the Gorkha, and the brave Gorkha regiment and contingent. They are brave people, and always protect the innocent people.
    I am sure, you must have done a lot of research on this one, and it shows in your work. Thank you for sharing.
    My best wishes always.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Chitrangada, so nice to hear from you after a while. Really treasure and appreciate your comment. So glad that you liked my story. Yes, research is a big part of any of my writing. It gives me great joy to do the research, while writing a story.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. nedhamson says:

    Reblogged this on Ned Hamson’s Second Line View of the News and commented:
    A good and brave tale!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Ned for promoting my story in your blog. Always a pleasure to receive your support.

      Like

  5. A tale of crime and punishment, a heroic stand of the underdog and a valuable historical lesson about the Gorkha legacy. I am continually impressed by how you find those unassuming individuals who rise from the ordinary to the extraordinary.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Well somehow I seem to manage to create the characters. Yes, heroism for a just cause, an underdog, and history have always been an integral part of many of my stories. I must thank you deeply for always taking the time to read, enjoy, like, appreciate, and comment on my stories. I treasure every bit of your feedback.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. swadharma9 says:

    i always appreciate the inspiring quality of your stories! you combine history & fiction so seamlessly!🙏🏼❤️🙏🏼thank you!🌺

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for your beautiful words of appreciation. You give me much encouragement. I am so glad that you find my stories inspiring and like the way I mesh history with fiction. Thank you dear friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. swadharma9 says:

        one ray of sunshine thanks another ray of sunshine for the light❤️ “let there be light” indeed!🌞

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Beautifully said.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Unicorn Dreaming says:

    Another wonderful story, written with great heart and feeling.. thank you, Fiona 😊🌻😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Fiona, thank you so much for appreciating my story. Your kind words give me much encouragement to keep on writing.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Excellent story, Trishikh. It would make a good film. Good details and heart of a hero.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Rebecca, I always look forward to your comments. So glad that you liked the story. Yes, it indeed could be made into a movie.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We could use more good writing for films! How many pages of stories do you have on hand now? 40 stories?

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        This was my 58th story, in this blog Rebecca, written from August 2020 onwards. I plan to write many more ofcourse, get some of it published if possible, and it would be a great honour to see someone make a movie out of any of them.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Congratulations! 58 is an impressive number of memorable stories.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        Thank you Rebecca, I have to write many more in the years to come.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. katelon says:

    Another wonderful, powerful and historic story. I appreciated that Tau was able to fulfill his destiny in a way different than the normal Gorkhas army path. The story also highlights that we all have gifts to give and a mission that is ours to fulfill. I am so ready for the end of this dark timeline that allows and promotes things such as organ theft and so so much violence.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Katelon, thank you for always being so appreciative of my stories. Your comments gives me great joy.

      I too am glad that Tau could fulfil his destiny, though in a bit different way that his ancestors.

      I too pray for humanity to give up its evil ways of exploitation each other, nature, and the world itself.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Ana Daksina says:

      Come on, solar flash! 🌄🎶✨

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Trishikh says:

        Thank you Ana.

        Like

  10. Unsungpoet says:

    What a beautiful story…I feel like I know that old man, & it brought tears to my eyes🥲

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      So glad that you like the story. It really makes my day when someone appreciates. It gives me great joy to know that the character of Tau felt to real to you, and that my story was able to move you emotionally, bringing tears to your eyes.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for liking my story and reblogging it in your website. Really treasure and appreciate the gesture.

      Like

  11. Kirsten says:

    This was a great read! Very inspiring. Thank you for sharing Trishikh.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are most welcome Kirsten. So glad that you liked this little tale of mine and found it inspiring.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Lokesh Sastya says:

    Hi Trishikh, Tau, has done his job, excellently, by saving the orphanage children from the organ smugglers. I’m proud of Gorkhas and their contributions. Thank you. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Lokesh, as always, your comments give me great joy. I really forward to them and treasure every word of appreciation.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Lokesh Sastya says:

        Actually I was eagerly waiting to read your story. This is inspiring. 😁💡✨

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Dear Lokesh, I know that you always eagerly wait for my stories. You are one of the strongest fans that I have, if I can take the liberty to say so.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Lokesh Sastya says:

        he…he…😁

        Like

  13. Arpita Banerjee says:

    Really an amazing one!! I love your Stories!! ✅

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Arpita, Thank you so much. You have always been so supportive of my stories, can’t thank you enough.

      Like

  14. orededrum says:

    I like very much your post, as always, but my like button still not working, I will come back. Have a nice day and thank you for your likes ! Diana

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Diana, I always treasure your likes and comments. They have always given me much joy. WordPress has this problem with the like button. It does not works at times. No issues, do come back whenever you can and like my post. A great day and weekend to you too.

      Like

  15. To me, Tau stands very tall. What an inspiration! Very well written.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Patrick, Thank you so much, so glad that you find Tau as an inspiration. Thank you for always being so appreciative of my writing.

      Like

  16. What a gruesome turn of events! Thank goodness there are still heroes in this world. Wonderful story, Trishikh!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Dawn,

      Yes this story is a bit gruesome, It was not intentional but came out this way. I think heroes are always there amongst us, we just simply do not come to know about many of them. Thank you so much for your beautiful comment, I always look forward to hear from you. Your kind words of appreciation and genuine feedback always gives me great joy.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Harshi says:

    Dear Trishikh, your stories are powerful and gripping. I love the way you are able to create the atmosphere in your stories and how fact and fiction merge. How history becomes relevant, entertaining and can be comprehended easily. It does not become daunting because your reference to the context is appealing and has clarity.

    You must get your work published so young readers can get inspired and form a love for reading, writing and history.

    It was the listlessness of history (my attitude towards the subject) that made me drop Arts and pick up Science instead. If young adults read your work, you might be able to change that. They will realise that history does not mean just “dates” and goes much beyond that.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Harshi,

      I must thank you from the bottom of my heart for this beautiful and thoughtful comment. Reading your words at the start of the day gives me immense joy, that I perhaps cannot explain. I am really glad that you like the way in which I create the atmosphere of fact and fiction.

      May your words come true and may I be able to publish my works some day. This was my 58th short story. I started writing them a bit late in life, just two years back from August of 2020. Hopefully I would write many more in my remaining days. It will be my gift to humanity.

      History can be very interesting if digested in an appealing fashion. Yes you are right, it is not only my effort to write some good short stories, but influence the next generations to love history, geography, and fiction, and specially develop the art of writing short stories.

      I believe that human beings evolved for their stories. No matter how advanced we become. no matter how technology changes. Stories will always remain. From the cave paintings of the primitive man to some podcast or some other futuristic method, stories will always have their appeal.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Harshi says:

        In complete agreement with you, Trishikh!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        So glad Harshi, that you do.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. KK says:

    Loved the character of Tau. Despite being old, he could save the honour of his khukri and tribe by protecting lives of innocent kids. This is another well-written and captivating story, Trishikh. It’s always a pleasure to read your stories.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear KK, thank you so much for your beautiful comment. It gives me great joy to know that you liked this story. Your comments always encourages me greatly.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. KK says:

        You’re welcome, always!

        Liked by 1 person

  19. annieasksyou says:

    Your final paragraph in the above comment is an excellent summation, Trishikh. Your growing body of work is a fine example of this tradition.
    I especially loved your description of Tau employing his heightened senses to adapt for his poor eyesight.
    I feared the gore when you described the child, but it was necessary to make your larger point about these horrific crimes. Quite accurate to describe the monsters—with or without disguises.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Annie, your have well justified my depiction of the gruesome killing of the child. I was debating with myself, whether to depict such a scene, or whether to keep all the children alive. Finally as you correctly say, it was perhaps necessary to make the larger point of this ruthless organ trade. “Monsters – with or without disguise” I really like this statement. Thank you so much for always putting so much heart in reading my stories. It gives me joy beyond comprehension.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. annieasksyou says:

    Trishikh: I just wrote a comment, but it hasn’t appeared. Did you get it?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Annie, I got your comment, but wanted to reply peacefully and not in a hurry. So the little delay. Sometimes I also avoid replying from the mobile, and only only prefer replying from the laptop, that’s why it gets delayed at times.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. annieasksyou says:

        Thank you. Sometimes the comment appears immediately, and sometimes it flies off into apparent nothingness.
        I don’t expect an immediate answer, though I appreciate your explanation. I am having my own tech issues and can’t use my phone as I had previously to like and comment on posts. It slows me down.
        And again, thanks for your visits, which are so generous—especially in view of the pressures on your time.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Technology, I think it’s a necessary evil. At times we can’t do without it, and at times it’s annoying.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Brilliant story! An inspiring hero!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. So glad that you fing Tau’s character inspiring.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. “Always use it to do good to yourself and others. Never use it on anyone who means no harm. The Kukri is the soul of a Gorkha. How you use it, will determine who you are and what you will be”
    Tau’s father was a wise man. Tau used it to save the children, putting his own life at risk. That was very brave! I hope I will have the courage to do the right thing when the situation should arise. It need not necessarily be killing.
    You can see, your story got me thinking deeply again.
    I wish the world would not need professional soldiers. And it seems to me that many brave men have died for the purposes of greedy and power hungry politicians or monarchs, which is a shame. I will never understand mankind’s acception of war as a normal thing to settle arguments.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Stella,

      Sadly you are right, war is nothing but making money through bloodshed. It is perhaps the cruelest of business model that there is, it exploits the sentiments of the people and demands human sacrifice. Sound very barbaric and primitive to me.

      In order to reach the next stage of evolution humans need to let go of war. Then only I think that we can evolve as superior beings.

      Sadly was, violence, lust, greed and other evils seems to be a very part of human beings.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. “Sadly was, violence, lust, greed and other evils seems to be a very part of human beings.”
        I think this is only as long as the majority of humans accepts this. Let’s make a new normal, where love prevails. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        I absolutely agree Stella.

        Liked by 1 person

  23. Priti says:

    Beautiful inspiring story with information of Gorkha origin. You did a lot of research on it. Thank you very much for sharing so beautiful story.🙂👍💕

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      My great pleasure Priti to have been able to share this story. So glad that you liked it. I always look forward to your comments.

      Like

      1. Priti says:

        You are welcome 🙂 I am honoured.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        The honour is equally mine.

        Like

      3. Priti says:

        😊😊😊

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Priti says:

    Beautiful inspiring story with full information of Gorkha origin! You did a great research on it. Thanks for sharing so beautiful story! 👍🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      So delighted to hear from you Priti. Always a joy to receive your ever-encouraging comments. Glad that you liked the story.

      Like

      1. Priti says:

        It’s my pleasure stay happy 😘

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Blessings and happiness to you and your family too.

        Like

      3. Priti says:

        Thank you 😊 how are you?

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        I am doing fine, however, due too work pressure, other priorities, and a bit of lack on my part, I have not been able to write a story every week, for the past few months. Hope I will get back to my full-fledged story writing soon. Currently I am writing my 59th short story.

        Like

      5. Priti says:

        Wow excellent ☺️ I have 87 short stories till now but my school has opened so don’t get enough time to imagine.😊😊

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Trishikh says:

        That’s a great achievement Priti. Don’t let go of this habit. Keep on writing even if not rigorously at least do so once a while.

        Like

      7. Priti says:

        Yes absolutely 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  25. You make hair stand up on our hands and gush with thinking of the story that is coming…remaining part of the story ..I mean 😊…
    You always have a twist in your tales with the history of your researched work…It keeps one captivated and enticed throughout the tale..Nice work..yes getting it to be published and turning it to a movie is a great idea which is a part of my plan tooo….I can give you more ideas too…😉 If you like 😊
    Picture book of the story/tale
    Animated movie – Anime style, Animated 3D and the regular movies
    Comic book might not suit for the tale however the fight will 😉
    I have all this in store for my line of work on the personal front 😊😇 along with making comic books, cartoon movie and a gaming app…you can try any of these tooo 😊…
    but it has been delaying for sometime for me….few months actually…searching good ways to exhibit to true authenticity of the lines of tales, stories……

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I cannot thank you enough for your kind words of appreciation. You have always been so supportive of my writings. I am so glad that my short stories appeal to you so much and they make the hair on your hands stand. Yes, history is a big part of atleast some part of all of my stories. I feel it is very important and interesting to know, how we have arrived at where we are today, what were the contributions and blunders of those before us.

      Your suggestions about publishing in various forms and mediums are very valid. I know a lot could be done. Someday it will happen, for now I just have to keep on writing.

      My best wishes to you with your work also. I too lag behind at times. It happens to all of us, the trick is get back on track.

      Like

  26. yayocayo says:

    Reblogged this on Yayo cayo.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Really appreciate your kind gesture to promote my story in your blog.

      Like

  27. Hi Trishikh
    Thank you so much for wonderful story and visit Historical palace Gorkha. As well, The Gorkha has unique history in Nepal.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are most welcome Ganesh. Yes, indeed the Gorkha are amazing people with a big heart and a fearless soul. This story is a small effort on my part to recognise them.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Goff James says:

    Thanks, Trishikh, for sharing such another wonderful inspirational tale. Happy Writing my Friend.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Goff, thank you so much for appreciating. Glad that you find my story wonderful and inspirational. Your appreciation gives me much encouragement to keep on writing.

      Like

      1. Goff James says:

        Pleasure. Great Read. Have a wonderful day My Friend.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        A great day to you too Goff. Do catch my next story this weekend. I am determined to publish it. Have not been able to stick to my deadline of a story every weekend, for the past few weeks.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Goff James says:

        Take care of yourself. Don’t stress yourself out with meeting deadlines. The joy is in the writing. Publish when you are ready. Have a wonderful day My Friend.

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        You are very right Goff, I will take your advice. A wonderful day to you too dear friend.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Goff James says:

        Many Thanks. Have a great day.

        Liked by 2 people

  29. A wonderful tale, beautifully written and captivating until the end!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      It gives me great joy when someone appreciates one of my stories. Appreciation works miracle to my writing engine. So happy that you liked this story t mine. Do visit again there are many more tales from India, some of which I am sure you would much enjoy.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I understand, appreciation provides motivation and reason to keep going, it makes one feel good and appreciated 🙂 have a wonderful day!

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        A wonderful day to you too. Have a great one. My best wishes.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you kindly, off mountain biking before work after breakfast 😀

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        My pleasure 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  30. Felic_J says:

    I just love your writing. The stories are always very original and well written. They bring joy in my life.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Felic, your appreciation also brings me great joy. So happy that you like my stories. I am ever indebted to your praises.

      Like

  31. Beautiful post. You are a great writer and so wise. I’m always awed by your unique storytelling.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Lebongang, thank you so much for appreciating my storytelling. I try to do my best in writing these stories, so happy that you find them appealing. I am thankful to God for this gift and to my friends like you, whose constant appreciation gives me great motivation to keep on writing.

      Like

      1. You are most welcome. We are all benefitting from your gift

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        My great honour and pleasure Lebogang. Have a great day.

        Like

  32. usfman says:

    With all the violence that happens in this story, why do I gain a sense of spiritual peace here?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Usfman, you have rightly spotted the underlying hint of spiritual peace that is the invisible backbone of this story. So glad that you could find it. Thank you for your lovely comment.

      Like

  33. usfman says:

    Very clever contrast for sure.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Many a times when I write, I myself am not aware of the subtle underlying messages that I am lacing on my story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. usfman says:

        Perhaps a picture or two might make the message clearer.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are right Usfman, few pictures will certainly make the message clearer, however, I am following a certain pattern and style, to which I want to stick to for now, and keep the hidden messages subtle. I want my readers to hunt for and find these messages, rather than me explaining it to them.

        Liked by 1 person

  34. I keep checking for your stories. I hope you know you have spoiled us readers. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I know I have not been unable to write for the past few weeks, partly due to work pressure and partly due to laziness. Though I have been cooking my 59th story and hopefully will release it by this weekend. Your comment gives me renew enthusiasm to continue writing. I am always so thankful to God for this friendship.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I understand, I’m happy to learn you are well in these unpredictable times. No rush is necessary. 🙂 I and lots of others enjoy your stories they always have proverbial message. 🙂 I am, too, so thankful to God for this friendship.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Now I am determined to publish the next story this weekend. Thanks for your encouragement, I needed the jolt.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. You are welcome. I look forward to it. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        I finished the story just now. Releasing it in a while today itself.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Look forward to reading it. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

      6. Trishikh says:

        It is published. Take your time and read it whenever you conveniently feel like.

        Liked by 2 people

      7. Thank you. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Verma’ji. So glad to receive your appreciation.

      Like

      1. vermavkv says:

        Sir, you are always the best..
        I like your writing very much..

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are too kind with your words of appreciation. I appreciate your writings too.

        Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      So glad that you find this story appealing.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Craig for showcasing my story in your blog.

      Like

  35. Equipping says:

    A very good article; thanks for posting it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are most welcome. Glad that you liked my story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Equipping says:

        I like all of your work. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are most welcome. I am inspired by your grasp on “The Word” too.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Equipping says:

        Thank you very much

        Liked by 1 person

  36. Equipping says:

    As I have said on many occasions, I appreciate your work. I am also very appreciative for all of the likes that you put on my articles. It is very good having you as an international friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      The pleasure is equally mine.

      Like

  37. Trishikh, I liked this story in spite of its gory scenes. I appreciate that the hero is a near-sighted old man. All of life is an opportunity to help others and rise to the challenges of life. It was satisfying that the hero won a medal and recognition for his bravery.

    I also liked the historical aspects of the story. I used a lot of timelines when I was teaching. One of the easiest timelines to make is a timeline of wars. Human beings are always fighting. I wish that weren’t so, I much prefer a timeline of scientific discoveries or a timeline of great works of art and music.

    It is hard to imagine a more evil villain than someone who would steal the organs of children in an orphanage. Sadly, there are situations in life that call for violence.

    Wishing you a beautiful day. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Cheryl, thank you so much for appreciating this story of mine. I know it was a gory in bits, but then as you say, things like that do happen in real life. I completely agree with you on the concept of timelines. Yes, war is something that I am also not in favour of. For that matter no one really wants war, apart from those who wants to profit from the misery of others.

      Thank you for this thoughtful comment. It gives me much encouragement to continue writing these stories.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. gc1963 says:

    A story of undaunted valour and also hope that life can present immense possibilities at unimaginable junctures and it is for one to muster courage to achieve what one has always dreamt or aspired for.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are very right. I think all of us dream of having undaunted valour but fail to display it when the time comes. Those of us who can overcome this inhibition, turn out to be real-life heroes.

      Like

  39. Chiru says:

    Didn’t know Gorkhas are related to Guru Gorakhnath… So much information in your post that make me realize what I knw is just a drop of water from Ocean..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Oh, I come to know new things everyday. Life is a constant learning process and we will always remain ignorant no matter how much we learn. It is God’s way to keep us humble and always eager to know more. Thank you for liking my story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Chiru says:

        True… constant learning everyday.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Exactly. Anyday I would prefer to be a student over a teacher.

        Liked by 1 person

  40. Enjoyed this. Lots to ponder.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much David. Glad that you enjoyed my story and the fact that it gives you much to think.

      Like

  41. lesleyscoble says:

    Loved and enjoyed this tale. I always regard the Gurkha with enormous respect and awe. They are gallant souls.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are very correct Lesley, the Goarkhas are indeed a gallant race. So glad that you liked my story. It’s always a pleasure to receive your compliment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. lesleyscoble says:

        Trishikh, It is always a pleasure to read your stories (for which I must find more time!) 🙏

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Thank you Lesley. Your words bring me great honour. I am so happy that my stories attract you. Do come back and read more when you feel like. My stories are not going anywhere.

        Liked by 1 person

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