The Price Of A Miracle

The jerk from a sudden impact startled Biju from his momentary slumber. In a split second, he applied the brakes as years of driving instincts kicked in, and the Toyota Innova Crysta veered and screeched to a dead halt. As the smell of grazed rubber gently floated into the MUV through its rolled-down windows, beads of perspiration appeared on the forehead of its seasoned driver. Looking back in his rearview mirror, Biju said a silent prayer and drove away as the broken body of an unknown man lay twitching in a pool of blood. Accidents such as these were not uncommon in the dead of a pitch-black moonless night on a remote highway, deep in the rural hinterlands of the Indian state of Bihar. To answer nature’s call in the open, sleepy villagers often crossed paved roads and national highways in the early hours.

Six hundred and thirty kilometres away from that unfortunate and unknown soul lying unconscious in the middle of a desolate highway in Bihar, a mother firmly hugged her son as he miraculously recovered from a deadly fever in a small and obscure rural hamlet in West Bengal. The village doctor had given an ultimatum the previous night, saying that the boy would not live to see the next day’s light. The mother knew that it was a miracle that her son had survived. She knew that the power of her God had triumphed over medical science.

Biju had started his job life as a helper to a lorry driver. Slowly he learned to drive himself and drove private cars for a while before shifting to commercial trucks transporting goods all over India. Two years ago, he finally managed to buy a brand-new Toyota Innova Crysta, making a hefty down payment from his savings, and paying the rest gradually through five-year monthly instalments. Now he was the proud owner of ‘Biju Car Rental Services,’ his very own business. He was happy to drive private customers to any destination and back within the subcontinent. The pay was good, the food and company were better, and it was certainly more comfortable than driving a rattling sixteen-wheeler.

With his nerves still shaking, Biju wondered how he could fall asleep behind the wheel with such a rested mind. The driver had not touched a drop of his favoured hooch in the past week. Neither had he smoked his favourite pot of hash. He had slept well the previous day and started his night drive with a relaxed and focussed mind. He wondered what ill fate or divine intervention had forced him to shut his eyes.

Biju was eager to complete his twelve-hour journey in a single go to meet his wife and child. He was returning home after chauffeuring a client around Bihar for the past week and finally dropping him off in Patna city. “How could I have fallen asleep,” shouted Biju and banged his fists on the steering wheel of his beloved car.

He thought he couldn’t fall asleep that way unless a god or a ghoul had intervened. Perhaps he was just an instrument in the hands of Yama, the deity of death who might have been there to take away the unfortunate man. He silently complained to the Devas for their cruel ways and cursed the Rakshasas for their bloodlust for the innocent. He did not know which force had caused the accident. He wondered whether it was the handiwork of the heavenly angels of the skies or the hellish demons of the depths? He did not know such things; he had always preferred to avoid religious and occult matters. He thought his wife would perhaps know, as she always stayed immersed in rituals and prayers.

“One never goes back. You never go back. I cannot go back,” mumbled Biju, still shaking from the unfortunate encounter a few minutes back. Drivers on Indian roads usually did not stop when they ran over someone. They feared being beaten to death or lynched by the mob in the absence of cops. When a driver could not drive away from the scene of an accident, he usually abandoned his vehicle and ran to hide and save his life. In most cases, their vehicle would be vandalised and burned to the ground by angry men on the streets if the police were not present or failed to arrive in time.

Though Biju had never run over a person, he had killed a dog once. The unfortunate canine had come in front of his truck from nowhere, and he could not apply the brakes in time to save the animal’s life. The episode had left him miserable for days. It had left a permanent scar on his soul that he had not shared with anyone, and now he had perhaps killed a man. How could he live with that?

“The man was still moving; he could be alive. If I take him to a hospital, perhaps he will not die. What if he’s already dead? Should I keep driving, or should I go back,” Biju’s mind filled with a million contradictions? Unable to focus on the road, too disturbed with his thoughts, Biju braked hard and once again brought his vehicle to a screeching halt. After regaining his composure and making up his mind, the seasoned driver turned his car and headed back towards the man he had left for dead on the middle of the highway a few kilometres back.

At that very moment in the obscure little hamlet in West Bengal, the mother of the recovering boy quietly went under the sacred peepal tree outside her house. Incanting in an ancient and forgotten dialect, she performed the last part of the ritual she had started twelve hours back. She thanked her Lord for bringing back her son from the jaws of death. She promised to be forever indebted.

When the guilty driver returned to the accident spot, the first tinge of dawn barely filled the atmosphere. No one had still come out on the road. Stopping right in front of the broken man lying in the middle of the highway, keeping the engine running, he stepped out of his vehicle and saw in the beam of his car’s headlight that it was just a boy of the same age as his son, still breathing faintly and holding on to his ebbing life.

Taking a few steps, he knelt and picked up the broken boy in his arms, wrapping his woollen shawl around him. “Do not die, my son. I will take you to the hospital,” saying these words, Biju laid the unconscious boy on the middle seat of his car and drove away towards the nearest town in search of a hospital.

“I have never prayed to you in my life, oh Lord. It is usually my wife who prays to you, and I have seen that you have always answered her prayers. I do not even know what my wife calls you. She never told me, for I have always been so sceptical about religion and prayer. I do not even know whether you are a power of light or a force of darkness. I only know that you are miraculous and have always answered my wife’s prayers. So today, I come before you with folded hands and promise to serve you till eternity if you save this boy’s life. I will be indebted to you forever,” said the agnostic driver, clasping his palms in a prayerful stance and driving like a madman to save the life of an unknown boy.

Sixteen hours after being assured by the resident doctor at a government hospital where he had dropped the little boy that the child would live, Biju reached his village in West Bengal. Throwing open his car door, he ran to meet his wife, who was standing outside their house. He tightly hugged his wife and kissed her on the forehead shedding tears of joy.

“You would not believe what happened to me. Last night I accidentally ran over a boy in Bihar. Initially, though I ran, I ultimately summoned the courage to return and take the boy to a hospital. I was certain that he would die. Then for the first time in my life, I prayed to your God. As I drove and prayed, miraculously, the boy held on to his life. Your God answered my prayer. The child did not die. After reaching him at the hospital, I kept on praying, and four hours later, the doctor pronounced that the boy would survive. Where is my son? Call him out. I need to hug and kiss him too,” said Biju with great joy and clasped his hands to continue giving thanks to the God of his wife, who had answered his prayers and saved the unknown boy’s life.

“Two days back, after playing in the river for the whole day, a terrible fever befell our son, and the village doctor said that he would not survive to see the next day’s light. I went and consulted with my God under the peepal tree and performed the sacred blood ritual in the night. The Lord spoke to me and said that the father had to take a life to save the son’s life. When our son miraculously recovered and sat up at dawn, I knew that a child was dying somewhere, and my son would live to see the morning’s light,” said Biju’s wife while tears streamed from her eyes.

“Then, as miraculously as he had healed, the fever came back. I ran to my Lord under the peepal tree, prayed to him with all my heart, performed all the rituals that I knew pleased him, and chanted all the mantras, but alas, he would not answer back. After suffering for four hours, our son took his last breath and left this world. His body is lying inside. Now I know why my Lord would not listen to my petitions, for he was answering your prayers. You choose the wrong day to accept and pray to my God,” said Biju’s wife and fell to the ground beating her chest with her fists and crying for her lost son.

Life And Death


Copyright © 2022 TRISHIKH DASGUPTA

This work of fiction, written by Trishikh Dasgupta is the author’s sole intellectual property. Some characters, incidents, places, and facts may be real while some fictitious. All rights are reserved. No part of this story may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including printing, photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, send an email to the author at trishikh@gmail.com or get in touch with Trishikh on the CONTACT page of this website.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Trishikh

Trishikh Dasgupta

Adventurer, philosopher, writer, painter, photographer, craftsman, innovator, or just a momentary speck in the universe flickering to leave behind a footprint on the sands of time..READ MORE

244 Comments Add yours

  1. nedhamson says:

    Reblogged this on Ned Hamson’s Second Line View of the News.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Ned for being the first person to reblog this story of mine. Always treasure your constant support.

      Like

      1. Michael Lewis says:

        Marvellous read.. Gripping hold of events captivating the emotional essense of persusal

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        Glad that you feel so strongly about this story of mine. Thank you so much.

        Like

  2. elvira797mx says:

    Amazing story, wirh a message like always. Thank’s for share, Trishikh.
    Have a wonderful day!
    Elvira

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Elvira, it’s always such a joy to hear from you. Thank you so much for liking this little story of mine.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. elvira797mx says:

        Always a pleasure follow your amazing blog, Trishkih, Thank you.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        It is also my great pleasure to interact with you. Have a great day and a lovely weekend.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. elvira797mx says:

        Thank you for your kindness, as well with you.
        Lovely weekend too.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello, Elvira 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello Tommy.

        Like

      2. elvira797mx says:

        Hello, Tommy!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. How are you doing today??

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        Only comment related to the story Tommy.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. elvira797mx says:

        Fine thank’s!
        And you?

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Your story is a powerful and beautifully written journey into faith and belief. You capture emotion so we’ll in your writing, it draws me into the heart of your story with clarity and meaning. Thank you Trishikh.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are most welcome Suzette. That is my humble strife – to convey a morally deep message through a literary rich, vivid, and interesting story, with clarity and ease of understanding, with as little as loose ends as possible.

      Like

      1. Well, you do a fabulous job in all those endeavors in your stories. 🙏

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are too kind with your appreciation Suzette. I treasure every bit of it.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. My pleasure.Trishikh. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        The pleasure is equally mine Suzette

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Kirsten says:

    Wow excellent read, Trishikh, thank you for sharing. That last line made me tear up.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Kristen, I am overwhelmed by your heartfelt comment. Yes, I always try to pack the maximum punch at the end of my story. I also like to build to an unexpected ending. Have a great weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Kirsten says:

        👏🏼👏🏼Have a great weekend too!

        Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Nice to meet you Tommy.

        Like

  5. Francochuks says:

    Wonderful and explicit 👍❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. So glad that you liked my story.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Lokesh Sastya says:

    Hi Trishikh, I just started reading the short story, and found that I have already reached the end. (This literally happened.)

    I don’t believe, the way you interlinked these two incidents of the same time. But I certainly believe “Nature has it’s own balance”.

    This story emerged from your daily life observations, incidents and “your curious mind”.

    For example, the Bihar and Kolkata connection, journey of Biju, Woman praying the Peepal tree, nature’s call in the open, and road accidents analysis.

    I’m making this comment short. And I enjoyed reading your story. Thank you so much! 😁

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Lokesh Sastya says:

      One point I want forget to mention — the conflict in Biju’s heart and mind. I’m happy he saved the boy. Truck drivers, and we humans in general, should sensibly solve such incidental conditions.
      This post became a single paragraph. I think there’s a problem with the editor. Please create enough spaces by dividing the post in suitable paragraphs. It’ll be easier to read.
      Thank you again.
      My best wishes for your next story.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Trishikh says:

        Dear Lokesh. You are right with about the conflict in Biju’s heart. Yes I know all of us drivers need to be sensitive on the road, however, road rage is something all of us want to avoid, and many a time we are forced to drive on.

        The editor sometimes stacks my stories into a single paragraph for for readers. I think it is got to do with the version of WordPress App you are using. I will try to check it. This problem continues to happen with many of my old stories till today.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Trishikh says:

      Dear Lokesh, however short or long, all your comments give me great joy. I learn and retrospect a lot from them. Yes, you are right, this story is heavily influenced from my experience of driving between Kolkata and Patna in the past 4 years.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I so look forward to the weekend to read your stories! This piece couldn’t have been better. Bravo!! Encore!!!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are so kind with your appreciation. I am so happy that you liked this little story of mine. Few weekends I have failed to publish due to other commitments and sometimes my laziness to write.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I understand the laziness to write. I had to make a firm agreement with myself to write every day for 60 days. Sometimes, my poems speak to others; other times they don’t. As long as they resonate with me and I am being true to myself, I am a happy writer and author. You need to be published. Hitchcock had a magazine years ago…not sure if he still does, but your stories would have fit in perfectly there.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        I am sure that one day I will get the opportunity to publish. Yes, I also agree dedication in the key to writing success.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. As, you never disappoint, you put your heart and soul in writing. Count me as your dedicated follower, I get it why you post on weekends, it took great amount of time and creativity to create this master piece, hats off Trishikh🙌🏻🙌🏻🌺

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I am just overwhelmed by your praise for my writing. Nothing gives me more joy. Yes, I usually write a story over a course of 7 days, writing an hour or two each day. I usually write early in the mornings. Sometimes when I feel too tired or bogged down with work, I fail to write. Am so glad to have you as a dedicated follower.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah , I know this , as I write in Hindi and when I get down to drafting ,it somehow blocks my mind and in odd times ,I get enormous amount of valueable ideas and thoughts,I just start finding pen and paper 😂
        In a snap beautiful thoughts of mind goes out ,if you didn’t put it down at the time when they hit. So ,I find you courageous to put all of this ,so genuinely and it connects with heart. This is what a true writer should be like.🙌🏻

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        I too always have my diary and set of fountain pens always close by. I go to with my diary and pen beside my pillow. So that whenever a thought comes, even if in the middle of the night. I am able to write it down. I even use a notes App to hot down ideas on the road and when I am on the move.

        One thing I follow is that, I have never abandoned a plot or a story. Once I have decided to write something I simply continue with it till I finish it. Till now things have always worked out.

        Sometimes, I just have a word or a sound and then I start making a story out it it. I do a lot of research while writing. This gives me a lot of joy.

        Liked by 2 people

      3. You are Wonderful Writer and a Dedicated one, Glad we met.🌟

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        I am also overjoyed to make your acquaintance.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Hello dear 👋

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Trishikh says:

        Greetings Tommy.

        Like

      1. How are you doing…….

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Once consciousness has taken hold of our psyche, it will be impossible to shake it off again, leading to self-awareness, overcoming self-interest and consequently compassion for the other.
    As a rationalist and sceptic, I have difficulties to even contemplating miracles of any kind. Having said that, if one perceives reality as an illusion then one cannot shut out the possibility of the impossible.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      That is so deep. I also think that there is a possibility of no divine intervention on my story. Maybe it was just coincidence. I leave it to the discretion of my readers. Thank you for this deep and thoughtful comment. I treasure every bit of our conversation.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ellshades says:

        Hi
        It’s a pleasure to read your works. You weave in your observations and thoughts and probably your heart into it while it still emerges as a story with a handsome form.
        As an Indian, I love how you use the English language to show our regional flavours. To have a distinct voice that shows through in a work, there must be some command of language.
        Thanks for the share. I catch some helpful words from your blog.
        This time, the story in itself didn’t compel me, but I admire the craft.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Your words, do bring me great joy. So happy to receive your comment. Yes, my heart’s desire is to share the stories from my country. English is a language I am comfortable in writing, hence I write in it. Though I also like to write in Bengali and Hindi as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. ellshades says:

        Good to know. May the muse be with you! 😄

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        Thank you ☺️

        Like

      5. ellshades says:

        Thanks for visiting my blog!

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Trishikh says:

        It is my pleasure to visit your blog

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Unicorn Dreaming says:

    Interesting story.. I’m glad he drove back for the boy.. in the scheme of things it was the right thing to do even though it cost him his own sons life.. balance.. thank you 💛🌻💛

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I also believe he did the right thing, but I myself am not sure, whether I would be able to do it. It takes a lot of courage to go back.

      Thank you for your lovely comment. Your words always gives me great encouragement.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Thank you for sharing another engaging and touching story, with a beautiful message. Keep up the wonderful work.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Chitrangada. As always, your appreciation gives me great joy. So happy that you liked the story.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello, Sharan 👋

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello Tommy. Nice to meet you.

        Like

      2. Hello Tommy Richard!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. How are you doing today??

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        Only comments related to the story Tommy.

        Like

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello Tommy.

        Like

  12. Very powerful – you had me willing Bidju to go back, and then, like Bidju’s wife, I wished their prayers had not been competing.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. I too wonder what happens when prayers compete.

      Like

  13. KK says:

    This is an amazing story, Trishikh. I had never expected this kind of ending, but your mastery of telling stories with twists and turns make interesting read. This is a good combination of belief, faith and blind faith. The character of Biju depicts natural human emotions very well. Beautifully written, as always 👍💐

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear KK, it gives me great joy to have been able to present this unexpected ending. So happy that you liked the story. As always I treasure your appreciation. Yes, faith and belief is at the core of this story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. KK says:

        You’re welcome, always!

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Shaun M. says:

    Thank you for this fantastic story! It left me literally blown away, I shall be chewing on it for awhile.

    The way you wove the two boys together was superb. You kept hinting at the end but I couldn’t see it because it was too horrible, too macabre. And the way he worked his whole life to build a career that ended up killing his own son! Unless, of course, it was just a coincidence. But if so, he’ll spend the rest of his life tortured by guilt because he did the right thing. All in all, a marvelous tale.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Shaun, than you so much for finding my story fantastic. Appreciation is the greatest reward for me.

      Yes, I was happy with the way I was able to connect the two boys. The plot just worked out. I usually do try to leave hints earlier in my story about the unexpected ending.

      Do read more of my stories whenever you feel like. I am sure that you would love many of them.

      Have a great weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. katelon says:

    Oh ….Trishikh……I don’t know if I can “like” this story or not. As always it is well written and drew me in. But I didn’t like that ultimately Biju would be punished for not only making the decision to be accountable and responsible, go back and take the child to the hospital but also for finally turning to a higher Source and invoking that Source for the first time in his life. It seems to me it would lead him to curse that higher power for now on and his suffer anger and hatred from his wife for turning to that power as well. So it seems like both would lose faith completely.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Katelon, you are very right, this is a really dark story put forward in a very simple way. There can be so many options and probabilitiea, about the things happened the way they did. Perhaps it was a dark Lord behind or a simple coincidence, however, one thing is for sure, that Biju did the right thing. Maybe this story teaches us to do the rights thing irrespective of all the outcomes and whatever the cost.

      Thank you for this thought provoking comment. Sorry, that this story upsets many of my readers, but then it just came out this way.

      Have a great weekend.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. katelon says:

        I understand.

        You have a great weekend as well.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello dear 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello Tommy.

        Like

    3. Hello, Katelin👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello Tommy. Greetings from India.

        Like

  16. Another well-told tale, Trishikh. I would like to say that I do not know the gods of Biju and his wife, but then it is the same belief that one must suffer in order for another to benefit that the billionaires of this world think about those who are starving. They could not give the poor a little, because it would compromise their wealth. Good allegory.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Rebecca, your thought on this story is very unique, and gives all of us to think much about it. You are right about the strong preying on the weak. Only if the rich decided to sensibly share a bit, the world would be a better place.

      Thank you for the lovely comment and like. I really treasure our interactions. A great weekend to you.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello Rebecca 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Greetings Tommy. Nice to meet you.

        Like

      1. Trishikh says:

        How you doing Tommy. A great day to you too.

        Like

  17. Thinking about this story takes longer than reading it. Thought provoking.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are right Geoff, that’s a beautiful way to put it. It is a big passion of mine to dabble with philosophical thoughts. So happy that my story makes you think much beyond the plot.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Alev Abla says:

    Although a little sad… I enjoyed reading your story.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Alev, thank you so much for enjoying my story. Yes, I know that it is a bit sad, but it just came out that way.

      Have a great weekend, dear friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Alev Abla says:

        Dear Trishikh, Happy weekend to your too…

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello dear 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello Tommy.

        Like

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hello to you too Tommy. Nice to meet you.

        Like

  19. gc1963 says:

    This is so sad….how can anyone’s life be sacrificed to save that of another one? It is heartrending.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Yes, GC you are right this is sad. Perhaps Biju’s wife’s God was a force of darkness. Maybe she practiced a dark art and consorted with a dark Lord. So the concept of sacrificing a life for the other. I leave all this to the imagination of my readers though. Some may chose the events and deaths to be merely coincidental.

      Thank you for this lovely comment. It really encourages me.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. gc1963 says:

    Yes, it is dark. Very, very dark. Darkness should not be promoted…I think in an indirect way your story says that but again dark forces should not triumph

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      I absolutely agree, and I also believe that darkness never triumphs.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. A really interesting and tragic ending. I would, of course, have preferred, if the God had rewarded Biju’s courage … 😉 🙂 … but then again, he didn’t even know, which God he was praying to …
    A fascinating read, as always!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Yes, Stella, I too would have preferred such an ending, however, the story just flowed this way, and I wrote it. Thank you so much for always commenting and liking my tales. I really treasure this. Have a great weekend.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. One has to follow the story, they tend to get a life of their own at a point.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Very true Stella, very true.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Hello Stella 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hi Tommy.

        Like

      2. How are you doing today??

        Liked by 2 people

      3. Trishikh says:

        Hi Tommy, we only comment and discuss about my stories in the comment section here. Philosophical thoughts, human concepts, life etc., All related to my story. We would love to hear if you would like to share your thoughts on the story itself, I am sorry that I would not be able to allow unrelated comments in future. Have a great day my friend.

        Like

  22. I liked the rest of this story, but didn’t like the ending. Wow, the God in this story is a real jerk-off. The guy was just doing the right moral thing. How was he supposed to know that that kid was to be sacrificed to save his son? Unless this was nothing but a coincidence, and this story is really about how deeply superstitious some cultures are.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are very right Bia, this story is deeply rooted in superstition. I don’t know whether to call such a power a God or a Demon. I do not know if it’s actions are justified or not. Even we fail to understand the mysterious ways of the Gods we believe, a good person gets cancer, an innocent child dies, and so on. Does that mean we lose faith, no we perhaps grow stronger facing such challenges. The more I think about this story, so much more comes to my mind. Then again this could just be merely coincidental events.

      Your comment unlocked so many new thoughts. I thank you for that. So happy to get your comment. I really treasure it.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Hello dear 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Best wishes Tommy.

        Like

      2. Trishikh says:

        Yes Bella, We are yet to get acquainted with Tommy.

        Like

      3. I’m so glad we met here’s??

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Trishikh says:

        Tommy, share comments only related to the story. A great day to you friend.

        Like

      5. Nice meeting you here as well??

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Trishikh says:

        Look forward to your comment related to the story.

        Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Ajay. So happy that you like my story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ajaypadala says:

        All ways welcome sir❤

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Trishikh says:

        I treasure your kindness and appreciation. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      3. ajaypadala says:

        I want to learn something from you sir❤ plz

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Trishikh says:

        Sure Ajay, what do want to know?

        Liked by 2 people

      5. ajaypadala says:

        I have a problem on selecting a good niche sir i confused totally

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Trishikh says:

        What exactly do you mean by niche. In what context are you confused.

        Liked by 2 people

      7. ajaypadala says:

        I want to do blogging on SEO, DIGITAL MARKETING, TECHNOLOGY,and Blogging sir

        Liked by 2 people

      8. Trishikh says:

        Well the subject is not new and there are already many many blogs on it, however, do not be discouraged.

        The first thing is that you have to be totally honest and passionate about the subject.

        2nd is you have to stick to a writing schedule, like 1 post every Wednesday and Sunday. Once or twice a week. Do not over post. Write few but well researched posts. Too many posts don’t count.

        Do a lot of research on the subject. See what other bloggers are doing. You can always learn from others.

        Liked by 2 people

      9. ajaypadala says:

        Ok sir..tq for spending your valuable time with me.❤

        Liked by 2 people

      10. Trishikh says:

        It is my pleasure to do so Ajay.

        Liked by 2 people

      11. ajaypadala says:

        But 1thing can u give me suggestion that which topic i select to start blogging…

        Liked by 2 people

      12. Trishikh says:

        The topic has to be something that you are madly passionate about. Something that you love like crazy. There is an audience for every topic under the sun, people will slowly start following you. Don’t worry about likes and follow, worry about a topic that you love with every molecule of your being. Then only will you have a successful blog.

        Liked by 2 people

      13. ajaypadala says:

        How can contact you sir..when i am in problem..i mean how can i text you sir..like email, whatsapp number??

        Liked by 2 people

      14. Trishikh says:

        Go to my contact us page given below and send me a message and will share my contact details with you on email:

        https://storynookonline.com/contact/

        We can take the conversation further from there.

        Liked by 1 person

      15. ajaypadala says:

        I are a expert sir❤..so you tell me one topic with low competition i will research on that i start my blogs on that sir

        Liked by 2 people

      16. Trishikh says:

        No it does not works that way. The topic has to come from your heart. You may not know much about the subject, but you just have to simply love it.

        Liked by 1 person

      17. ajaypadala says:

        Yes sir🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      18. ajaypadala says:

        I am a UG student sir

        Liked by 2 people

      19. Trishikh says:

        My best wishes and blessings are with you for a bright future.

        Liked by 1 person

  23. ellshades says:

    Hi
    It’s a pleasure to read your works.
    I like how you weave in your thoughts and observations and probably a bit of your heart into a story that still has a handsome form.
    Being an Indian, I admire how you present regional flavours. There is both observation and a good command over language to write the way you do and have a distinct voice. I must have already benefitted through the acquaintance.
    Thanks for the share! This time, the story didn’t interest me, but the craft sure did.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      The pleasure is equally mine to be able to bring forth these stories.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Arpita Banerjee says:

    Your stories have always been my favourite!! Yet another amazing read!! Sharing this on Facebook!! ☺️

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Arpita, thank you so much for always being so supportive of my stories. I am so glad that my writing appeal to you. It is a big honour for me to have my story shared in your FB page. Have a great weekend.

      Like

  25. Stories of life are not always so very straightforward are they? So I will ponder the joy and sadness awhile longer. Nonetheless a fine story Trishikh! Each time I read your stories I get a glimpse into a far away land, and I am grateful for every journey.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Patrick, you are very right, life is not always straightforward. It is usually very complicated and even challenging. I think it is our outlook which makes it liveable and even enjoyable amidst all storms and hardships.

      I am so glad that through my stories you get an opportunity to visit a far away land.

      Thank you for this beautiful comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. annieasksyou says:

    Trishikh: You certainly did pack emotional power and a surprise ending into this story. I read with interest your comment that you were leaving it up to the reader to reach a conclusion about the matter. I think that’s wise and adds to the mystery and depth. Faith—or the lack thereof—is so very personal and idiosyncratic after all.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      You are very right Annie, faith is something so personal. So believe in the power of a spiritual guru, while another perhaps worships a rock. All of us have the right to chose that which motivates and helps us carry on.

      My story is just something just happens. I do not know, the unknown why and how.

      Thank you for always being so appreciative of my stories. It really gives me great encouragement.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello dear 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Greetings Tommy.

        Like

  27. Thanks for the follow 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      My pleasure Rosaliene.

      Like

    2. Hello Rosaline 👋

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for promoting my story in your website. Really appreciate the find gesture.

      Like

  28. You made a very unpredictable end to your fictional story. Neither minor nor any of the previous readers have any indications. On a lighter note: The answer/outcome to the prayer, you made in your story is limited and hence you prayed passionately got an answer even though it was not a win!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      That’s a really good observation. Now that I read all the comments on this story, and read the story again and again – I feel, it’s perhaps the deepest and darkest one that I have written. Though there is hardly any gore or violence but it has a lot of darkness. Yes at the same time the story also teaches us to do the right thing no matter what, as you have rightly identified.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. A very thought-provoking story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. I always treasure your appreciation.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. I hear u says:

    Your story make me think on Do miracle still happens

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Well, I like to believe thati miracles always happen, though my story portrays a lot of darkness, I have to agree. Thank you for reading and commenting. Always treasure the support.

      Like

      1. I hear u says:

        Mine pleasure dear

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I hear u says:

        Well pessimistic behaviour is a part of our today’s life.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Trishikh says:

        Sadly it is very true, however, I believe that there are still optimistic people around, if we try a little, we can always find them.

        Like

      4. I hear u says:

        Exactly just a way of seeing

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Trishikh says:

        Absolutely right.

        Like

  31. ajaypadala says:

    If you want more traffic then contact me i will help you to get more traffic

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Ajay, thank you for the offer. I think for now I am comfortable with the traffic to my blog. I like to respond to each and every like and comment, so I need to build and handle the blog slowly and not rush to acquire huge traffic flows.

      Like

      1. ajaypadala says:

        Good sir❤

        Liked by 1 person

  32. ajaypadala says:

    I had researched a lot about traffic abd i want to get more traffic for others sir..can you tell me your opinon sir

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      I do not know much about traffic. I do not like to forcefully increase traffic. I like to grow organically and slowly. That way the growth is more permanent and your follower base is more reliable.

      Like

  33. Thotaramani says:

    Marvelous story 😊👍🏻

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much. It gives me green joy to receive your appreciation.

      Like

      1. Thotaramani says:

        I really understand that we have to spare some time to write ✍️

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        Very true, very true…

        Like

  34. Very nice beginning sir , will take time to complete . Found a lot of new vocabulary…😊 Thank you so much .

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      It is my pleasure to have been able to bring forth this story. Yes, I do try to introduce uncommon words for my readers to know them. I treasure the comment, do come back and finish the story and let me know how you liked it.

      Like

  35. Anand Bose says:

    Interesting narrative

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thanks Ananda. So glad that you found the story interesting.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Craig for reblogging my story. I treasure your constant support.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for reblogging and promoting my story in your website. It is a big honour for me.

      Like

  36. Oh, Trishikh, what a tragic story! But sometimes, I wonder if the universe really does work that way. Excellent story, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Dawn, Sorry I did not see your comment earlier. Somehow it landed in my spam folder. Glad that I saw it though. Thank you for your beautiful comment. I always treasure our interactions. Yes, this story is tragic, there is no doubt about that. You also rightly saw, they universe works in it sown and unknown ways.

      Like

  37. Vinny says:

    Really enjoyed that!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Vinny. It’s my pleasure.

      Like

      1. mosckerr says:

        Howdy Trishikh, thanks for your visits to my blog.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Trishikh says:

        You are most welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

  38. usfman says:

    Bijou did what he had to with the boy on the street. His relationship with God should not be in question. It’s his relationship with his wife that he should be more concerned with.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      This is a great angle that you have discovered. You are absolutely right. When I wrote the character of his wife, I knew she had darkness in her, but then everyone loves their child, and people and willing to do bad things to save their children. Your comment gives me much to think.

      Like

  39. David F says:

    Wow… That was disturbing! Excellent writing.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much David. Yes, it delves in the darkness a bit. Three is a positive message hidden in it though.

      Like

  40. Kally says:

    Extremely powerful and moving.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much Kally for finding my story powerful and moving.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello, Kally 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Holla Tommy.

        Like

  41. Every story you narrate carries tears somewhere hidden , this one- seems like written struggling to hold back some..

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Trishikh says:

      Dear Richa, you are very right, emotions are a big part of my stories. I have always believed them to be a great and essential ingredient of a good little tale. This story has influence of my many years of riding and driving all over India. I have been a passionate motorcyclist in my younger days and still an enthusiastic motorist.

      Thank you for the lovely comment. It brings tears of joy.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hello dear 👋

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Trishikh says:

        Hi Tommy.

        Like

  42. cigarman501 says:

    A moving story, thank you!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for liking the story.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you for liking my story.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for reblogging my story.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for reblogging my story.

      Like

    1. Trishikh says:

      Thank you so much for reblogging this story of mine.

      Like

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